Tag: Chang

Humboldt for Chang

Congratulations to Prof. Chang on receiving a Humboldt Fellowship for Experienced Researchers for the 2024-25 academic year! Prof. Chang will use this fellowship to carry out research on multilingual phonetics and phonology at the Institute of Phonetics and Speech Processing in Munich, hosted by Prof. Jonathan Harrington.

Cutler Fellowship for Chang

Prof. Chang has been awarded the inaugural Anne Cutler International Visiting Fellowship. With the support of this fellowship, he will visit the MARCS Institute for Brain, Behaviour and Development in Sydney in Spring 2024, hosted by Dr. Mark Antoniou. Kudos to Prof. Chang!

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Chang & Fraser in LSA Proceedings

A paper entitled “On the auditory identifiability of Asian American identity in speech: The role of listener background, sociolinguistic awareness, and language ideologies” (Chang & Fraser, 2023) has been published in the Proceedings of the Linguistic Society of America. Abstract: The current study examined the auditory identifiability of Asian American ethnoracial identity, including the role of listener […]

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Kellogg & Chang in Languages

A paper entitled “Exploring the onset of phonetic drift in voice onset time perception” (Kellogg & Chang, 2023) has been published in the open-access journal Languages. Abstract: Recent exposure to a second or foreign language (FL) can influence production and/or perception in the first language (L1), a phenomenon referred to as phonetic drift. The smallest amount of […]

Chang & Ahn in Languages

A paper entitled “Examining the role of phoneme frequency in first language perceptual attrition” (Chang & Ahn, 2023) has been published in the open-access journal Languages. Abstract: In this paper, we follow up on previous findings concerning first language (L1) perceptual attrition to examine the role of phoneme frequency in influencing variation across L1 contrasts. We hypothesized […]

Chang at UR

Prof. Chang will be in Rochester this week to give a colloquium at the University of Rochester’s Department of Linguistics. The title of his talk is “Intoxication effects on bilingual speech”.