Welcome, Community Health Workers and Supporters!

NEPTHC works in partnership with CHW supporting organizations and CHW professional associations to determine training needs responsive to current community challenges.  NEPHTC collaboratively designs, develops and markets programs. CHWs often serve as moderators or co-instructors, contributing to content development.  NEPHTC leads learning development, manages learning management systems, authoring tools, meeting platforms, data gathering and offers public health expertise.

 

Recommended Trainings for CHWs

Popular self-paced training for CHWs:

Introduction to Outreach Methods and Strategies

Introduction to Interviewing for CHWs

Introduction to Ethics for CHWs

 

Training Partners and Collaborators

NEPHTC builds relationships with training partners, associations and other CHW-supporting organizations. NEPHTC provides learning development, online event hosting, learning management system, and evaluation capabilities to improve the CHW training infrastructure and deliver continuing education that complements existing CHW core competency training.

 

 

Training collaborations include:

  • Boston Public Health Commission, CHEC (2017-present) – workshop design, self paced design, core competency learning management system support, marketing
  • MACHW (2020 – present) – workshop series
  • Peer Learning Series for Maine, NH, Vermont – (2020)
  • Sponsor NHCHW annual meeting (2019)
  • Southern New Hampshire AHEC – CHW training support (2016- present)
  • University of New England – CHW training support (2019 – present)
  • Maine Mobile Health – CHW training support and development collaboration (2018 -2020)
  • RI CHW Association – CHW training support (2017)
  • Community Health Workers of Vermont (VT DPH Chronic Health) – training consulting (2020 – present)
  • Connecticut Partnership for Public Health Workforce Development, including CHWs – training support (2016 – present)
  • Participant in Regional NE CHW Coalition, convener Region 1 HHS OASH

 

CHW Advisors

Gail Hirsch–NACHW Board Member, Former Director of Office of Community Health Workers, MA Department of Public Health

 

Jamie Berberena–Community Engagement Director, Groundwork Southcoast. Ms. Berberena served as a CHW for 15 years and was Regional Chapter Leader in Southeastern Massachusetts and Advisory Board member for the Massachusetts Association of Community Health Workers. She was a core competency trainer with the Center for Health Education for the Boston Public Health Commission and has facilitated CHW trainings with the Justice Resource Institute. She contributes upstream programming approaches for Health Begins and serves as a policy council member with the Massachusetts Public Health Association.

 

Areliz O. Barbosa–COVID Collaborative Resource Coordinator, Partners in Health, is a CHW and was the Regional Chapter Leader for the Pioneer Valley for the Massachusetts Association of Community Health Workers from December 7, 2019- December 31, 2021. She currently works at Bay Path University in an interprofessional team teaching Introduction to Public Health, Culture Humility, and Social Justice to Physician’s Assistant students. She is passionate about sharing and using her lived experience as a tool to teach and inspire others.

 

 

 

Environmental Scan

In 2016, NEPHTC conducted an environmental scan to “help [NEPTHC] better understand the evolving CHW workforce model in each [New England] state and identify potential roles NEPTHC might play in the future development of the CHW workforce.“   The scan, which can be accessed here, NEPHTC_CHW Environmental Scan_2016, consisted of reviewing state and national reports and resources and conducting a series of group interviews of CHW supporters by state. It revealed that formal and informal networks advocating for CHWs existed in each state and momentum towards formal credentialing of CHWs was gathering strength, with four of six states in the process of establishing some sort of system.  Recommendations included that NEPHTC work with the CHW allies who were “looking to improve their CHW training infrastructure, including continuing education programs.”