Lejeune Lab

Our goal is to leverage the state of the art in computational mechanics to investigate multiscale emergent behavior in biological and bio-inspired systems, and make predictions about mechanical phenomena. Current areas of research involve (1) integrating data-driven and physics based computational models and (2) predicting the behavior of highly heterogeneous soft materials. As a group, we are trying our best to share the code and datasets associated with our publications under open source licenses.

Openings

Current BU graduate students: If you are interested in joining our group, email Dr. Lejeune with a summary of your research interests, CV, and availability to meet.
Prospective PhD students: Email Dr. Lejeune with a brief statement on why you are interested in this lab, and  indicate interest in our group when you apply to the mechanical engineering PhD program.

Keywords related to our work:  mechanics, computational science, machine learning, biomechanics, image analysis, benchmark datasets, open source software.

Further Information

Please check out our iMechanica Journal Club post to learn more about our group’s mission to promote open science in the mechanics community: https://imechanica.org/node/25935

We are also working on a list of Open Access Mechanics datasets: https://elejeune11.github.io/ — please get in touch if you have something that you would like to contribute to the list!

Our Software+Datasets page contains links to some of our ongoing projects. If you are interested in using our code or data, please go ahead! In addition, don’t hesitate to get in touch if you have any questions. 

We co-host the Closer Look Journal Club in biomechanics (and related areas) with colleagues Manuel Rausch, Johannes Weickenmeier, ‪Adrián Buganza Tepole‬, and Matthew Bersi. The journal club is hosted on zoom, and we welcome all who are interested. To sign up for updates, please use this form. For previous recording and information on upcoming talks, please check out the Journal Club website.

Acknowledgements

We gratefully acknowledge support from:

  • The David R. Dalton Career Development Professorship
  • The Haythornthwaite Foundation Research Initiation Grant
  • The Hariri Institute Junior Faculty Fellowship
  • The National Science Foundation CELL-MET ERC EEC-1647837
  • The American Heart Association Career Development Award
  • The National Science Foundation Grant CMMI-2127864
  • The Office of Naval Research Award N00014-22-1-2066