Related Resources

AFRICAN AJAMI LIBRARY:

AAL is a collaborative initiative between Boston University and the West African Research Center (WARC) in part funded by the British Library’s Endangered Archives Programme. The AAL Project is led by Dr. Fallou Ngom (Professor of Anthropology and Director of the African Studies Center at Boston University). AAL is envisioned as a digital “Library of Alexandria” of Islamized Africa, a continental open access public repository of aggregated Ajami materials.

AJAMI LAB AT THE UNIVERSITÄT HAMBURG:

The Ajami Lab focuses on past and present research related to Ajami—that is, sub-Saharan African languages written in Arabic script—which is conducted by scholars within the Centre for the Study of Manuscript Cultures at the Universität Hamburg. As part of 12-year research project supported by the German Research Foundation (Deutsche Forschunsgemeinschaft, DFG), the Lab is currently working to 1) catalogue Ajami manuscripts held in private and state collections of Mali and West Africa and to 2) carry out historical and linguistic analysis of the material brought to light by the cataloguing process. These endeavors are being jointly pursued by the Hamburg Unit working in Germany and the Bamako Unit in Mali. The Ajami Lab also serves as a collaborative research hub for a network of specialists at the Universität Hamburg and beyond who investigate Ajami literacy, texts and manuscripts across Africa and its global diaspora.

AFRICAN LANGUAGE MATERIALS ARCHIVE (ALMA):

The African Language Materials Archive, or ALMA, is a multi-partner project focusing on the promotion and documentation of literature and literacy in the languages of Africa. It further serves to assist African language authors and publishers in publicizing and distributing their work. The digital collection contains documents of Wolofal Ajami (in the Wolof language) that have been contributed by Prof. Fallou Ngom of Boston University.

AFRICAN ONLINE DIGITAL LIBRARY:

The digital library “Diversity and Tolerance in the Islam of West Africa” contains archival and research materials that explore Islamic practices in the West African countries of Senegal and Ghana. Presented in six galleries of audio and video interviews, transcripts, photographs, maps, documents, and multimedia presentations, these resources shed much-needed light on how Muslims in West Africa accept religious difference and create productive interactions among Christians, Muslims, and practitioners of other faiths.

ENDANGERED ARCHIVES PROGRAMME (EAP) OF THE BRITISH LIBRARY:

The Endangered Archives Programme (EAP) facilitates the digitisation of archives around the world that are in danger of destruction, neglect or physical deterioration. Thanks to generous funding from Arcadia, a charitable fund of Lisbet Rausing and Peter Baldwin, it has provided grants to more than 400 projects in 90 countries worldwide, in over 100 languages and scripts. Since 2004, the Programme has digitised over seven million images and 25 thousand sound tracks. Archive types digitised so far include rare printed sources, manuscripts, visual materials, audio recordings. It contains an extensive collection of Ajami manuscripts from West Africa.

INSTITUTE FOR THE STUDY OF ISLAMIC THOUGHT IN AFRICA (ISITA):

The Institute for the Study of Islamic Thought in Africa (ISITA) at the Northwestern University is the only research institute in North America specifically devoted to the study Islam in Africa. ISITA sponsors and facilitates collaborative interdisciplinary scholarship, programming, and publications on the Islamic tradition of learning in Africa and promotes a broader awareness of the role of Islam in African societies. It encourages intellectual exchange, especially with Africa-based scholars, and produces new knowledge on Islamic thought in Africa. It has established Northwestern as an internationally known hub of research, publications, programming, and student training in the field of Islam in Africa.