Tagged: Study Habits

Time to Mix it Up: The Student Guide to Good Study Habits

November 16th, 2010 in Uncategorized 2 comments

We’re told to find ourselves a quiet nook, to maintain a schedule, and to tackle one subject at a time. Our parents tell us that naps are a waste of time. And mass media conglomerates encourage us to fill every spare moment with a quick video clip or a two-minute game on our cell phones. But as it turns out, it is time to quit buying into what we’re told creates the optimal environment and habits to learn.

First, forget about holing up at that same seldom-visited spot over the span of time before an exam. Studies have found that students who vary where they study will remember the information better than those who stay in one place. The brain makes associations between what we study and where we study it, so the greater the number of associations, the more enriched the material, and the better entrenched the memory.

Experts advise students never to have a "go-to" study spot; changing locations can help students better learn the information.

Experts advise students never to have a "go-to" study spot; changing locations can help students better learn the information.

Next, throw the one-subject-at-a-time approach out the window. Varying the type of material studied in one session has been shown to leave a deeper impression on the brain than focusing on a single topic at a time.

For example, a recent study in the journal of Applied Cognitive Psychology featured two groups of 4th graders being taught how to calculate the dimensions of a prism. There were four existing problem sets; one subject group was given repeated examples of one type of problem, while the other was given a mix of all four types of problems. A day later the groups were given separate tests on what they had learned, and the 4th graders who had been given the mixed problem sets performed twice as well.

Last but not least, when you have some down time, take the airplane approach: turn off all your electronics and take a nap. This technological age encourages nearly constant multitasking, but multitasking deprives our brains of much-needed rest. A continuous stream of digital input-via cell phones, iPods, computer screens, and televisions- forfeits the time when our minds could better learn and remember information, even form ideas.

Don't be this guy: Overloading your brain might seem to save time, but in the end it impairs your learning abilities.

Don't be this guy: Overloading your brain might appear to save you time, but in the end it impairs your learning abilities.

A study at UC-San Francisco found that rats do not process new information and transform it into a persistent memory until they are given a break from those new experiences. Thus in order for us to process what we’ve learned and experienced during the day, we need to rest our brains.

Recent studies have shown that sleep not only consolidates what you have already studied, but it also primes the mind for further learning. So an afternoon nap between classes (as long as you set your alarm) can actually be the final element to a perfect study system.

For Reference:

Think You Know How to Study? Think Again- NPR

Digital Devices Deprive Brain of Needed Downtime- The New York Times

Forget What You Know About Good Study Habits- The New York Times

Behavior: Napping Can Prime the Brain for Learning- The New York Times

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