Our Podcast: “Food &”

 

 

Listen to Episode 5 here:

 

Roundtable Preview of The Curse of the Connoisseurship 

The world of beverage studies is as unique as it is complicated, which makes for rich — and necessary — discussions on the topic. Engaging with these issues and hearing various perspectives is essential in changing the beverage industry so it reflects more of what the world looks like, not just what wine and spirits have traditionally represented.

In our fifth podcast episode, Amy Johnson chats with Altamash Gaziyani and Marie-Louise Friedland for a preview of discussions for the BU Learn More Series, “The Curse of Connoisseurship: Discussions of the Boston Beverage Scene,” hosted by the Diversity & Inclusion Office in conjunction with the students and alum of the Gastronomy Department.

 

Amy Johnson, Moderator

Amy moved to Boston five years ago from a land-locked state and fell madly in love with the fact that seafood here is cheaper than the price of gas. Exploring the city one cup of chowdah at a time, she gravitated towards BU’s Gastronomy department, beginning her studies in the Fall of 2019. Now in her fourth semester, her main focus is on wine studies, particularly as it relates to social injustice, climate change, and gender inequality. She is a graduate of the University of Arizona with a double major in Journalism and Anthropology.

 

Altamash Gaziyani, Panelist

Altamash took the scenic route to specializing in beverage studies in Boston, but has never doubted that the hospitality industry is where he belongs. After spending nearly a decade as a line cook, he bit the bullet and threw himself into bartending following his gut and never looked back. Still in awe at how much he has to learn, he currently spins drinks at Craigie on Main while pursuing academic and professional opportunities that tug at and explore liquor consumption and lore. He holds an MLA in Gastronomy from BU and a BPS in Culinary Science from the Culinary Institute of America.

 

Marie-Louise Friedland, Panelist

As a recent Boston transplant from Texas, Marie-Louise found herself wanting more out of the food and beverage industry in terms of education. After Covid-19 caused a major shift in her day to day job as a restaurant manager and sommelier, she decided to finally take the jump into graduate school and entered the Boston University Gastronomy Department as a Master’s Degree candidate. What gets her really fired up is the consumption culture surrounding alcoholic beverages (specifically wine) and how that culture both past and present can enlighten a path to a more inclusive and diverse future. She is a graduate of the University of Texas at Austin with a Bachelor’s of Science in Advertising.

 

Gastronomy Program Recommended Readings

In this episode, panelists discuss sexual harassment and assault within the beverage industry, in which they reference reading She Said by Jodi Kantor & Megan Twohey, available through Penguin Random House.

Also, they recommend reading these articles by Julia Moskin from the New York Times; “A Celebrity Sommelier Is Accused of Sexual Assault” and “The Wine World’s Most Elite Circle Has a Sexual Harassment Problem.”

 

Original Music Provided By
Jay Dibiasio
Additional Music Provided By
Free Music Archive
Slow Smoke III, by Crowander
Pixies, by Ketsa
Nobody Sleep, by Paolo Pavan




Listen to Episode 4 here:

 

Honoring Black History Month

In our fourth podcast episode, host Elizabeth Weiler, chats with Corrine DaCosta, adjunct professor of Culture and Cuisine of the African Diaspora in the Gastronomy graduate program at Boston University Metropolitan College. They discuss recent representations of African cuisine in media, integrating Black food history and culture in food studies programs, and hosting an ideal dinner party with Georgia Gilmore, Leah Chase, Edna Lewis, and Mashama Bailey to celebrate Black History Month.

 

Corrine DaCosta, Coffee Colored Concepts

Corrine DaCosta is a classically trained chef from the Culinary Institute of America with a Bachelor of Professional Studies in Culinary Arts Management. After an introduction to gastronomy through a course at the CIA, Corrine became enthralled with all facets of food studies. This led her to obtain a Master of Liberal Arts degree in Gastronomy from Boston University, where her aim was to take complex culinary and gastronomic concepts and create pragmatic analogies for BIPOC communities. Currently, she is an adjunct professor teaching gastronomy at her alma mater, and also works on projects with Coffee Colored Concepts, her culinary mindfulness brand.

In this episode, Corrine suggests reading Black Food Matters, edited by Hanna Garth and Ashanté M. Reese, available through University of Minnesota Press.

Follow Corrine and more digital content creators influencing Black history, culture, and food, like: @blackfoodie and @blackforager

 

 

Elizabeth Weiler, Host 

Elizabeth has worked in the food industry for many years, from bussing tables to cake frosting to community garden work. She completed a food studies minor at the University of Oregon where she solidified her interest in food systems. She currently studies at Boston University, where she is excited to find out where her graduate degree will take her.

 

 

In this episode, Elizabeth references reading Black Food Geographies, by Ashanté M. Reese, available through University of North Carolina Press.

 

 

 

Gastronomy Program Faculty Recommended Readings

For more information about African American food history, Associate Professor and Gastronomy Program Director, Dr. Megan J. Elias suggests reading Recipes for Respect, by Dr. Rafia Zafar, available through University of Georgia Press.

 

 

Original Music Provided By
Jay Dibiasio
Additional Music Provided By
Free Music Archive
Rise Above, by Makaih Beats 
Rokko, by Moro Kaju

 

 

 

 

Listen to episode 3 here:

 

Kosher Wines and Winemaking

In our third podcast episode, host Elizabeth Weiler, talks to Jeff Morgan, vintner and founder of Covenant Wines. They discuss the rise in popularity of kosher wines, and some of the differences between conventional winemaking and kosher winemaking.

 

Jeff Morgan, Winemaker & Author at Covenant Winery in Berkeley, CA & Tel Aviv, Israel

Jeff Morgan is the only winemaker who has also been a critic for the prestigious Wine Spectator magazine, where he worked as West Coast Editor from 1992 to 2000. He has also written for The New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Food & Wine, Elle Magazine and—with his wife, Jodie—has penned 10 books on food and wine. Before becoming a writer, Jeff made wine on New York’s Long Island. In 2000, he started America’s first winery dedicated solely to rosé—SoloRosa—which he ran until 2008. Concurrently, in 2003, he founded Covenant Winery in California’s Napa Valley, where he and his late business partner, Leslie Rudd, created a new quality paradigm for kosher wine.

Jeff began making wine in Israel in 2013. Today, Covenant is the only winery that makes wine in both the U.S. and Israel. Covenant wines are now sold worldwide, from the U.S. to Israel, Europe, Asia, Canada, Mexico and South America. Prior to his wine-related activities, Jeff was the court musician and bandleader for Prince Rainier of Monaco in the 1980s. Eventually he decided he was more interested in what he was drinking than what he was playing.

 Jeff is an experienced lecturer and teacher who travels worldwide spreading his message of fine food and wine—while weaving them into the history and heritage of the Jewish people.

For more information about kosher wines, foods and recipes, read The Covenant Kitchen, Food and Wine for the New Jewish Table, written by Jeff and Jodie Morgan.

 



Elizabeth Weiler, Host 

Elizabeth has worked in the food industry for many years, from bussing tables to cake frosting to community garden work. She completed a food studies minor at the University of Oregon where she solidified her interest in food systems. She currently studies at Boston University, where she is excited to find out where her graduate degree will take her.






Original Music Provided By
Jay Dibiasio
Additional Music Provided By
Free Music Archive
 Dry Sand
Ketsa
 Gentle Wave
Ketsa

 

 

 

 

Listen to episode 2 here:

 

Native American Heritage Month

In our second podcast episode, host Amanda Balagur, talks to Elena Terry, from the Native American Food Sovereignty Alliance. They discuss some of the challenges facing indigenous foodways, the roles of Native youth in preserving food traditions, and how consumers can support Native chefs and farmers.

 

Elena Terry, Food & Culinary Program Coordinator at NAFSA

Elena Terry is the Founder and Executive Chef of Wild Bearies, a non-profit catering company that focuses on community outreach, education, responsible gardening practices and utilizing traditional ingredients in the daily lives of the participants. She has partnerships with Intertribal Agriculture Council, UW Madison and various tribal farms and producers where she promotes and supports their work by showcasing the ingredients in a way that builds connections. Elena also helps with Mobile Farmers Market in Dane County, sharing indigenous ingredients with the community. She is a member of the Hocak Nation in Wisconsin and considers herself a lifelong learner of their traditional ways and food sources of the woodland area.

 

Amanda Balagur, Host & Food Journalist

Amanda Balagur is a Boston-based freelance copywriter and food journalist who has written for The Huffington Post, Chowhound and Alma, among others. She is an alumna of the BU gastronomy program, where her research focused on food history and cultural exchange through food, and is also the managing assistant editor of Food, Culture & Society. She has been doing voice overs for TV, radio and the web, in addition to radio announcing and reporting, for over a decade. Her professional background includes stints in higher education, fine dining, indie music, financial services and as a professional baker. In her spare time, she enjoys foraging outdoors, cooking at home, collecting vinyl and learning to box and embroider. Find her online at amandabalagur.com.

 

Gastronomy Program Faculty Recommended Readings

For more information about indigenous foodways, Professor of the Food Policy and Food Systems, Dr. Ellen Messer suggests reading Indigenous Food Systems: Concepts, Cases, and Conversations.  Edited by Priscilla Settee and Shailesh Shukla, available through Canadian Scholars’ Press.

 

Prof. Messer also recommends watching Gather, released in 2020 from director, Sanjay Rawal. This critically acclaimed documentary film is about the growing movement for Native American food sovereignty.

 

Original Music Provided By
Jay Dibiasio
Additional Music Provided By
Free Music Archive
 Dream Catchers
 Lobo Loco
 Around the World uploaded 2019
 Flowery Meadow
 Lobo Loco
 Waiting For You uploaded 2016

 

 

 

Listen to episode 1 here:

Remembering Hispanix Heritage Month

In our first podcast episode, host Amanda Balagur, talks to Chef Krysia Villon about her culinary roots, food studies in native Peruvian foods, and the impact of the coronavirus upon the foodways of the Hispanix community.

 

Krysia Villon, Chef & Food Historian

Krysia Villon is a born-and-bred Bostonian, Peruvian American chef, instructor, food historian, and recent graduate of BU. While her personal chef business, Chiqui’s Kitchen, caters mostly to families and working professionals, her other passion includes exploring, playing with, and teaching others about indigenous products of the Americas. She received her BA from Mount Holyoke College, her AS in Culinary Arts from Johnson & Wales University at Providence, and most recently her MLA in Gastronomy from BU, focusing on quinoa’s role in the expression of Indigeneity on the Peruvian table. Two years ago she started documenting her food journey, thoughts, and recipes on a food blog, Kahlo’s Eyes, named for her daughter so that her chiquitina would always have access to family recipes but also of family and general history as it relates to food. 

 

Amanda Balagur, Host & Food Journalist

Amanda Balagur is a Boston-based freelance copywriter and food journalist who has written for The Huffington Post, Chowhound and Alma, among others. She is an alumna of the BU gastronomy program, where her research focused on food history and cultural exchange through food, and is also the managing assistant editor of Food, Culture & Society. She has been doing voice overs for TV, radio and the web, in addition to radio announcing and reporting, for over a decade. Her professional background includes stints in higher education, fine dining, indie music, financial services and as a professional baker. In her spare time, she enjoys foraging outdoors, cooking at home, collecting vinyl and learning to box and embroider. Find her online at amandabalagur.com.

 

Gastronomy Program Faculty Recommended Readings

For more information about Hispanic and Latin American foodways, Associate Professor and Gastronomy Program Director, Dr. Megan J. Elias suggests reading Food Across Borders, Edited by Matt GarciaE. Melanie DuPuis, and Don Mitchell, available through Rutgers University Press.

 

Original Music Provided By
Jay Dibiasio
Additional Music Provided By
Krysia Villon
La Muralla
El Polo Salió de España
Jania y Arturo
Matices released 1981