Heather Barrett

HeatherBarrett

My dissertation, titled “In Hot Pursuit: Gothic Virgins and Villains in Nineteenth-Century American Fiction,” explores how Gothic discourse both creates a space for alternative expressions of gender and sexuality and registers the frightening implications that those alternative expressions have for stable conceptions of identity. This project includes chapters on nineteenth-century American fiction narratives by George Lippard, E. D. E. N. Southworth, Louisa May Alcott, and Julia Ward Howe. You can view my CV here.

 

 

Education
Ph.D., English and American Literature, Boston University, expected 2017
M.A., English and American Literature, Boston University, 2009
B.A., English, Wellesley College, 2008

Recent Publications
“Review of Philosophies of Sex: Critical Perspectives on The Hermaphrodite.” Legacy 31.1 (2014). (book review)

“Some Current Publications.” Restoration 34.1-2 (2010): 175-214. (annotated bibliography)

Recent Presentations

“Howe’s ‘Hideous Progeny’: Gothic (Re)Visions of Gender in The Hermaphrodite.” Triennial Society for the Study of American Women Writers Conference. Sheraton Society Hill, Philadelphia, November 2015.

“Learning English Doesn’t Have to Be Scary: How Gothic Tales Translate into ELL Course Content.” First-Year Writing Program Conference on the Teaching of Writing. University of Connecticut, March 2015.

“Gothic Currents of Barbaric Sexuality in George Lippard’s Quaker City.” Graduate Music Society of the Departments of Musicology and Ethnomusicology Conference. Boston University (February 7-8, 2014).

“Eliza Haywood’s Desiring Female Philosophers.” British Women Writers Association Conference, The Ohio State University. Columbus, Ohio (March 31-April 3, 2011).

“‘An Alarming Spectacle’: The Evolving Role of the Female Abolitionist in Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Dred.” Catharine Maria Sedgwick Society Symposium, Salem State College. Salem, Massachusetts (June 16-20, 2010).

Courses Taught
Department of English:
Freshman Seminar in Literature (Section Topic: Gender and Sexuality in 19th Century America), Fall 2016
Readings in American Literature (Section Topic: Dangerous Desires), Spring 2013
Freshman Seminar in Literature (Section Topic: American Gothic Tales), Fall 2012
Readings in American Literature (Section Topic: Identity and Desire), Spring 2012
Freshman Seminar in Literature (Section Topic: Gothic Tales: Terror and Taboo), Fall 2011
Readings in World Literature (Section Topic: All You Need Is Love), Spring 2011
Readings in American Literature (Section Topic: American Voices), Fall 2010

Writing Program:
Freshman Seminar in Writing for ESL students (Section Topic: Gothic Tales from around the World), Spring 2016, Fall 2015, Spring 2015, Fall 2014, Fall 2013
Freshman Seminar in Writing and Research (Section Topic: The Damned Mob of Scribbling Women), Spring 2011
Freshman Seminar in Writing (Section Topic: The Damned Mob of Scribbling Women), Spring 2010