Category: Type of Post

Join us on May 25th for the 11th Annual BUMC McCahan Education Day

May 3rd, 2016 in Announcements, Classroom Technology, Goldman School of Dental Medicine, Graduate Medical Sciences, Medicine, Public Health

As the academic year closes, it’s time to sharpen the saw, reconnect with colleagues, and network with our BU community and education vendors at the 11th Annual BUMC McCahan Education Day on May 25th.  This year’s theme is Interactive Learning and we have a charismatic keynote speaker, Dr. Colin Montpetit visiting from the University of Ottawa.  He will model our theme and speak about his experience transforming his teaching style from a ‘sage on the stage’ lecturer to an engaging facilitator. The day includes workshops, lunch, vendor networking time, a Medical Campus Deans’ Panel on Innovations in Teaching, a poster session, awards and oral presentations.  Register for the entire day or just part of it.  Check out this year’s Schedule of Events.  The event will be held in the Hiebert Lounge on the 14th floor of the School of Medicine Instructional Building at 72 East Concord Street (just a hop, skip, and a jump away from the BUS stop on Albany Street) and it runs 8am-3:30pm. Registration is now open for BU faculty, staff, and students.  We hope to see you there.

By Tagged , , ,

Posting YouTube Videos in Blackboard Discussions

April 26th, 2016 in Blackboard, Learning Management Systems, Online and Blended Learning, Tips & Tricks, Video Streaming

Do you currently use the discussion board tool in Blackboard? If so, you may be looking for ways to increase student engagement and participation inside your discussion forums. A common complaint about discussion boards is that unless they are graded or required by the instructor, students do not want to participate. The conversations between students are full of flattery and follow the leader, and often lack the depth that is found in the face-to-face classroom environment.

One possible solution is through the use of YouTube video postings to the discussion board in place of the traditional text responses. To set this up, students will need to create their own YouTube channel using a Google Account. Luckily, anyone can create a Gmail account or for added features, BU students and faculty are also able to set up Google Apps for Education accounts through BU: (http://www.bu.edu/tech/support/google/).

Once a YouTube channel is created, students can upload their video from either a smartphone or computer to their YouTube channel and copy the video’s Share URL into the Blackboard discussion board thread by clicking on the “Insert/Edit Embedded Media” button. Students who are concerned about posting personal information on YouTube have the option of saving videos as “unlisted.”

More

By

Software Carpentry: basic training in scientific computing

April 19th, 2016 in Announcements

Not all scientists must also be expert computer programmers, but basic knowledge of programming fundamentals can be an important tool in your professional toolbox. The ability to automate repetitive tasks and to modify or create simple programs is a major boon in terms of research productivity and creativity. Here at BU, Research Computing Services (RCS) offers a regular series of scientific computing tutorials to help researchers get up and running. While these tutorials work well for many researchers, some may benefit from a more comprehensive approach. To meet this need, RCS is currently exploring offering Software Carpentry workshops.

Software Carpentry is a non-profit that supports teaching basic programming to early-career scientists through 2-day workshops. The goal of these workshops is to provide programming tools that are immediately useful, and an introduction to best-practices (or just good-enough practices) in scientific computing. For some researchers, a Software Carpentry workshop can be a “one stop shop” to learn enough programming to further their research. For others, it can be an entry point to a deeper study of scientific computing.

A typical workshop includes lessons on the Unix shell, programming in a popular scientific programming language (e.g. Python, R, or MATLAB), and version-control and collaboration using Git and Github. Instructors strive to make their teaching highly interactive, leaning heavily on live-coding and hands-on exercise as opposed to lecture. The lessons themselves are developed and improved by a large community of instructors. All of the lessons are shared on Github and anyone can suggest a modification. After thousands of revisions from hundreds of contributors, the lesson plans are highly polished and anticipate many common misunderstandings.

Back to BU, Research Computing Services recently hosted a Software Carpentry Instructor Training workshop, and anticipates hosting our first Software Carpentry workshop this coming summer. Please don’t hesitate to contact us if you are interested in attending or hosting a workshop.

By

BUSM Faculty Attend Instructional Strategies Live Labs (IS Lab)

April 11th, 2016 in Announcements, Medicine

How best to introduce a busy faculty member to new educational approaches and technologies? Scheduled for December 15, 2015 and next on April 19, 2016, BUSM faculty attend a drop-in when-you-can, two-hour lab and talk one-on-one with Educational Advisors: media specialists, clinical educators, librarians, and early adopters. Faculty brought their specific course/seminar/educational topic on thumb drives and the Ed Advisors consult with them on how to make it more active learning. Individual stations for different pedagogies such as flipped classrooms, simulation exercises, interactive large lectures, and small group sessions and for different educational technologies such as MS Mix, Personal Capture, and Qualtrics. Faculty casually moved from station to station and asked questions of the Ed Advisors. A looped slide presentation with soft music shows the different resources. Short snapshot presentations by Ed Advisors showcases their topics. Participants receive handouts, resource lists, a relaxing environment and a light lunch. Stop by next Tuesday at noon in the Instructional Building L-206 and join the conversations.

 

By

Dill: The Digital Language Lab

April 5th, 2016 in Case Studies, College of Arts & Sciences

To increase exposure and practice in interpersonal skills, the Geddes Language Center adopted Dill, or “The Digital Language Lab” in the summer of 2014.  Classes use Dill for various activities, such as paired conversations, listen and repeat exercises, interpersonal dialogues, oral presentations, and speaking exams all in the effort to increase oral proficiency.

For instructors, the software is very easy to use. As students log in, they appear as an icon on the instructor’s lab controller. Instructors can group students (in pairs, usually) for conversations simply by drawing a line between the students. To make sure students remain on task, instructors can monitor or converse with students by drawing a line between them. Activities can be recorded by the instructor initiating a recording task and assigning it to the class. For individual recordings, students have a recorder with a simple interface. All recordings are saved automatically, and instructors access them via a web interface.

In the Spring 2016 semester to date, 26 instructors representing a number of different foreign languages have brought their classes to the lab to use Dill. Students have reacted positively. Many students prefer being recorded in a booth with a noise isolating headset while speaking instead of having to perform in front of their peers. This allows them to consider their speech instead of possibly being self-conscious, and as a result they tend to generate more speech. Not being able to see the person they are speaking with also allows students to focus on what they’re saying and not their body language.

More

By

Google module now available in Digication

March 29th, 2016 in Announcements, Collaboration Tools, Digication, e-Portfolio, Google Apps, Tips & Tricks

Google Digication moduleDigication, BU’s ePortfolio software, now allows Google app documents, including Google Docs, Google Spreadsheets, Google Forms and more, to be embedded within an ePortfolio module. Students can create, share, and collaboratively edit a document in Google Docs and have the result be pushed to the portfolio, with the original revision history still available in Google Docs. You can find this function in Digication by pressing Add A Module, selecting the Google option, pressing Add This Module and following the instructions.

By

Join us at the Tech Fair!

March 23rd, 2016 in Announcements

On Monday, April 4 from 10am-2pm, BU IS&T will host a Tech Fair open to all BU students, faculty and staff. The event will be in Metcalf Hall at the GSU. There will be snacks, drinks, prizes and more, along with displays from companies like Microsoft, edX and Verizon. No advance registration is required. More details are available. Come join us!

By

Free Tool for Writing Data Management Plans

March 1st, 2016 in Announcements

Over the last few weeks the Boston University Libraries have been evaluating a tool, free to the BU community, for creating, writing, and editing data management plans called the DMPTool. As many of you might be aware data management plans are increasingly required from funding agencies and institutions. However, what is included in a data management plan often varies from funder to funder, which can make writing them a bit of a headache. The DMPTool is one solution to this problem.

Created by the California Digital Library the DMPTool allows you to:

  • collaboratively write data management plans
  • find templates from numerous funders
  • find public data management plans for reviewing
  • obtain assistance and get feedback on writing a data management plan
  • find data management resources and tips

For more information visit the DMPTool, watch the video below, or contact Tom Hohenstein.

By

Free In-Video Quizzing Tool

February 17th, 2016 in Classroom Technology, Flipped Classrooms, Tips & Tricks

There has been a lot of buzz recently about an approach to presenting video content known as “in-video quizzing.” In-video quizzing involves inserting questions into pre-existing videos to periodically check the viewer’s understanding of what is being presented and/or as a more formal approach to assessment using video as the medium. Moreover, integrating quiz questions into videos is a way of creating more interaction between the typically passive viewer and the material, making for a more engaging experience. There are more and more tools appearing on the market that allow this functionality.

One tool that allows free use of their software with only a few features locked for premium subscription users is Zaption. With a free account, you can:

  • Watch as many video lessons as you like
  • Create your own video lessons using 6 interactive elements with a single video
  • Share lessons with your students and colleagues
  • Track viewer progress and responses with built-in analytics
  • Copy and edit ready-to-use video lessons from the Zaption Gallery

As implied, there are other features available if you become a paying customer including LTI (Learning Tools Interoperability) integration into Blackboard, but the free tools allow you to experiment quite a bit. Zaption’s Web-based service requires no installation and their interface is friendly and easy to use. A handful of BU faculty have begun to use Zaption in their online courses, but it is clear that it can be used in any course where students will be asked to watch video content outside of class. In-video quizzing can be a great way to capture students’ feedback or level of understanding of material presented in video form.

You can check out this Katy Perry video we applied the Zaption tool to for fun if you want to see some of its capabilities. Or just create your own lesson in minutes at Zaption.com. Enjoy!

Screen grab of Zaption Lesson

By

Congratulations to Dr. Strickland

February 10th, 2016 in Announcements, Facebook, Social Media, Twitter

Colleagues,

Many of you will remember Eldon Strickland, who served at BU as an Associate Director in the Office of Distance Education, as well as an advisor for centers such as CADER, CFLP and other units. Eldon attended many of our Ed Tech Collective meetings while he worked at Boston University.

Today we can congratulate him to his successful defense of his dissertation, which he accomplished on Tuesday, February 9, 2016 at BU’s School of Education. In his dissertation entitled “The Effect of Teacher Self-Disclosure on Student Motivation and Affect Toward Teacher in Online Education” he examines the effect of TSD and comes to some interesting conclusions.

Hopefully we will soon be able to point to a published article based on his work and invite him to our Ed Tech Collective to share his findings. Overall the importance of student-teacher engagement as one of the pillars for successfully motivating students is highlighted, as well as the need for us – as Educational Technologists – to support and educate our faculty in leveraging the technologies and tools we have at our disposal to achieve this beneficial level of engagement.

Congratulations Eldon!

By