Category: Other

Webinar on plagiarism in student presentations

February 28th, 2014 in Announcements, Plagiarism Detection, Turnitin

Next week, Turnitin will host a free webcast to share strategies for enhancing student understanding of academic citation and integrity for multimedia presentations. It will be held at 1pm on March 5. Register to attend.

By

COMSOL event at BU

February 10th, 2014 in Announcements, COMSOL

COMSOL Multiphysics will be hosting a workshop directly on the BU campus on March 6. COMSOL is used by to engineers, chemists, physicists, biologists, and anyone else interested in modeling and simulation of real-world multiphysics systems. The planned speaker is Dr Jinlan Huang, who has a PhD from BU in Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering. More

By

Webinar: How instructors respond to plagiarism

January 28th, 2014 in Announcements, Plagiarism Detection, Turnitin

How do instructors respond when they encounter plagiarism? And, how do these responses change if plagiarism continues? The makers of Turnitin, BU’s originality checking software, conducted a survey of over 1,600 U.S. instructors to find out how instructors are addressing plagiarism in their classes and what impact academic integrity policies and multiple infractions may have in informing instructor response. On January 30at 1pm, they will hold a complimentary webinar to review the survey findings and highlight key takeaways from the survey. Sign up to view the session.

By

Submit directly from Google Drive to Turnitin

November 19th, 2013 in Announcements, Blackboard, Collaboration Tools, Google Apps, Learning Management Systems, Online and Blended Learning, Plagiarism Detection, Tips & Tricks, Turnitin

Turnitin, BU’s supported software for academic integrity and faster grading, has recently introduced a “Cloud Submit” feature that allows students to submit assignments directly from Google Drive or Dropbox, convenient for students who are working on collaborative assignments in Google Drive or who do not wish to pay for Microsoft Word.

Cloud Submit

We recommend accessing Turnitin through its Blackboard integration. To create an assignment that will work in Turnitin: in any of your Blackboard course’s content areas (“Assignments”) or the like, go to the Assessments menu and select Turnitin Assignment, and follow the instructions. You’ll then be able to see the assignment’s results by going to Course Tools in the lower left corner of the course and selecting Turnitin Assignments. If Turnitin Assignments doesn’t appear under Course Tools, you can turn it on by going to Customization.

Note that while students may use Dropbox to submit assignments to Turnitin, faculty should never return student grades or comments through Dropbox. Because BU has no service agreement with Dropbox, Dropbox does not count as a school official for purposes of FERPA, and sharing student records with

By

COMSOL Multiphysics event

November 4th, 2013 in Announcements, College of Arts & Sciences, COMSOL, Engineering

We invite faculty who are interested in COMSOL Multiphysics to a local event and encourage them to share information on this potentially great learning experience with students.

COMSOL is used by to engineers, chemists, physicists, biologists, and anyone else interested in modeling and simulation of real-world multiphysics systems: simulations that involve multiple physical models or multiple simultaneous physical phenomena. More

By

Using Facebook productively in class: Sophie Godley

April 16th, 2013 in Case Studies, Facebook, Public Health, Social Media

Sophie Godley often begins the semester in her community-health class by setting ground rules, including expectations for electronic media. She gently teases students that perhaps they can spare an hour or two away from communicating with others, with particular reference to Facebook, and instead focus on themselves and their learning. During one of these conversations, it struck her that Facebook also had potential as a positive learning resource. Prof. Godley’s students often emailed her links to articles relevant to the current class’s material, and she thought that Facebook offered an easy way for them to share those articles with each other directly.

In fall 2012, she created Facebook pages for her classes at both undergraduate and graduate levels, which she invited students to “like”. She made it clear that students did not have to be her Facebook “friend”, and that participation in the page was voluntary. She has now started three different pages for the three classes she teaches, and has reached 462 students. In addition to generating student content and discussion, past and present students can interact on the page. Prof. Godley can post jobs and internships, and include both current and former students. She can also ask questions about articles and generate back-and-forth in the comments. She has also found it “relatively painless” to manage the Facebook pages, compared to many other administrative tasks of teaching.

By

Flipped talk on flipped classrooms

February 11th, 2013 in Case Studies, Engineering, Flipped Classrooms, TED-Ed

This Wednesday, BU engineering professor Lorena Barba will give a Teaching Talk on the topic of the “flipped” classroom, in which course content (such as lectures) is delivered online in order to free up class time for interactive participation. Practising what she preaches, Prof. Barba will be flipping the talk itself. She is asking attenders to view an interactive online presentation before they come to the talk. As a tool, Prof. Barba uses the free TED-Ed platform, which she also uses in her classes (see an example here).

Prof. Barba has written a longer piece in defence of the flipped classroom, with many links, available here.

By

Enhance and save time on your grading with Turnitin features

February 6th, 2013 in Blackboard, Collaboration Tools, Learning Management Systems, Plagiarism Detection, Tips & Tricks, Turnitin

At his Teaching Tech Talk today, Turnitin representative Shawn Lowney demonstrated some features of the Turnitin software that many users may be unaware of. Most faculty know Turnitin for its OriginalityCheck plagiarism detection function, and Lowney briefly addressed how it can perform this function well. But he also addressed other sides of Turnitin that may be less familiar.

Turnitin’s GradeMark portion contains many functions to make grading easier. Its QuickMark system allows you to save time on grading papers by dragging and dropping your most frequently used comments directly onto the paper. You can also add audio comments to convey the tone of your comments. Turnitin is integrated with Blackboard, so grades can be passed easily between the two systems.

Turnitin also includes PeerMark software to make student peer commenting easier by anonymizing their reviews. PeerMark is linked closely with OriginalityCheck and GradeMark so that you can move between the three kinds of reports easily and get a comprehensive view of a student’s work.

BU offers Turnitin via the Center for Excellence and Innovation in Teaching; these features are available to all BU faculty now. We do not yet have a structure in place for offering technical support to faculty, but hope to have one established soon.

By

Piazza: social networking for courses

November 14th, 2012 in Case Studies, College of Arts & Sciences, Learning Management Systems, Piazza, Social Media

Professors in several departments at BU (including Computer Science, Chemistry, Physics, and Mechanical Engineering) often use the free social discussion tool Piazza in their courses. Piazza is free, and allows threaded discussions to happen in a user-friendly way. Students in these courses are encouraged to post their course-related questions on Piazza, significantly reducing emails that are directed to the course staff. Questions posted on Piazza are then answered by the course staff, or, in many cases, by other students. Questions posed in these courses have ranged from logistical issues (“Which lab are we doing this week?”) to conceptual issues from students grappling with the material (“I tried solving problem 3 this way, but it didn’t work – can someone point me in the right direction?”) The latter are particularly good at drawing multiple students into the discussion.

Piazza can help you keep on top of what’s going on in your course, while at the same time reducing the amount of time you spend responding to students over email. Piazza posts can be read on the web site, whose features make it easy to see which posts need an instructor’s attention. They can also be viewed and responded to through the Piazza app on your favorite mobile device. You can also choose to get updates from Piazza via email. BU IS&T does not offer support for Piazza, but it is an interesting option for professors who feel comfortable exploring free online teaching tools.

By