Category: Schools and Colleges

MET College Ed Tech Colloquium Series: Deterring & Detecting Plagiarism

October 5th, 2016 in Learning Management Systems, Metropolitan College, Online and Blended Learning, Plagiarism Detection, Tips & Tricks, Turnitin

On Wednesday, September 27th, Metropolitan College hosted the second in an ongoing series of presentations on the integration of various educational technology tools and techniques in online, blended, and face to face classes. This series has been organized by a group consisting of staff from Metropolitan College departments of Educational Technology & Innovation and the Office of Distance Education. Specifically, this session looked at a variety of methods and means for deterring and detecting plagiarism. We want to thank all who attended. If you were not able to attend the event, please feel free to watch the recording or view the slides from the presentation.

The presentation covered a range of methods, from more traditional strategies and best practices, to a demonstration of the Turnitin tool, its latest incarnation Turnitin Feedback Studio, and its integration into Blackboard. The questions and discussion that followed illustrated how important a topic this is for us to be focusing on at this time. Special thanks to Andy Abrahamson, Yuvaraj Gunasekaran, Emily Heffernan Helter, Dan Hillman, and Shannon Rose McAuliffe for presenting on such an important topic.

Be on the lookout for an announcement about October’s installment of this series on the topic of tools and techniques for incorporating video into your courses.

All presentations take place in Room 109 of the Fuller Building, 808 Commonwealth Avenue. Attendees who cannot come in person can attend virtually. Please direct any questions you may have about this series to Emily Heffernan Helter, Assistant Director of Educational Technology and Production, in the Office of Distance Education eheff@bu.edu.

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Fabula Maps

May 24th, 2016 in Announcements, Case Studies, College of Arts & Sciences, Maps and GIS, MediaKron

Fabula Maps is a new tool that allows the easy design of interactive maps. It has already been used by BU faculty in the Art History and Archaeology departments. It is free to explore, so please check out the tool and its gallery of sample maps.

Fabula allows the design of single-author public sites for free; collaborative and private sites require a paid subscription. For this reason, for student-generated map content, we continue to recommend the use of Boston College’s MediaKron tool, which the BU community can access entirely for free through our pilot partnership. (Please contact Amod Lele if you’re interested in MediaKron; you can find his email via Exchange or the BU Directory). If you’re looking to create a map as a reference for your students rather than having them create it with you, have a look at Fabula. To get started, try their first steps guide.

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Social-media recommendations from students

May 17th, 2016 in Blackboard, Communication, Facebook, General Studies, Sargent College of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, Social Media, Tips & Tricks, Twitter

A group of BU faculty and staff met with students in early May to hear their recommendations on uses of social media in the classroom. The students were all seniors, from COM and Sargent College (previously from CGS). We are summarizing their recommendations here for the wider BU community.

These students recommended not to force particular uses of social media in the class: let students use a closed course Facebook group as they see fit to build community, not grading them on it (or at most grading their participation pass-fail). They also recommended that faculty acknowledge and integrate ongoing current events into their classes, as a way of moving the focus off grades and into applied learning, and that Facebook and Twitter are appropriate platforms for this. For more informal discussions, they preferred closed course Facebook groups to Blackboard discussion forums.

There will likely be another meeting before the summer is out. If you’re interested in attending and have not already been invited to this group, please contact Amod Lele (he can be found via the BU Directory).

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Join us on May 25th for the 11th Annual BUMC McCahan Education Day

May 3rd, 2016 in Announcements, Classroom Technology, Goldman School of Dental Medicine, Graduate Medical Sciences, Medicine, Public Health

As the academic year closes, it’s time to sharpen the saw, reconnect with colleagues, and network with our BU community and education vendors at the 11th Annual BUMC McCahan Education Day on May 25th.  This year’s theme is Interactive Learning and we have a charismatic keynote speaker, Dr. Colin Montpetit visiting from the University of Ottawa.  He will model our theme and speak about his experience transforming his teaching style from a ‘sage on the stage’ lecturer to an engaging facilitator. The day includes workshops, lunch, vendor networking time, a Medical Campus Deans’ Panel on Innovations in Teaching, a poster session, awards and oral presentations.  Register for the entire day or just part of it.  Check out this year’s Schedule of Events.  The event will be held in the Hiebert Lounge on the 14th floor of the School of Medicine Instructional Building at 72 East Concord Street (just a hop, skip, and a jump away from the BUS stop on Albany Street) and it runs 8am-3:30pm. Registration is now open for BU faculty, staff, and students.  We hope to see you there.

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BUSM Faculty Attend Instructional Strategies Live Labs (IS Lab)

April 11th, 2016 in Announcements, Medicine

How best to introduce a busy faculty member to new educational approaches and technologies? Scheduled for December 15, 2015 and next on April 19, 2016, BUSM faculty attend a drop-in when-you-can, two-hour lab and talk one-on-one with Educational Advisors: media specialists, clinical educators, librarians, and early adopters. Faculty brought their specific course/seminar/educational topic on thumb drives and the Ed Advisors consult with them on how to make it more active learning. Individual stations for different pedagogies such as flipped classrooms, simulation exercises, interactive large lectures, and small group sessions and for different educational technologies such as MS Mix, Personal Capture, and Qualtrics. Faculty casually moved from station to station and asked questions of the Ed Advisors. A looped slide presentation with soft music shows the different resources. Short snapshot presentations by Ed Advisors showcases their topics. Participants receive handouts, resource lists, a relaxing environment and a light lunch. Stop by next Tuesday at noon in the Instructional Building L-206 and join the conversations.

 

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Dill: The Digital Language Lab

April 5th, 2016 in Case Studies, College of Arts & Sciences

To increase exposure and practice in interpersonal skills, the Geddes Language Center adopted Dill, or “The Digital Language Lab” in the summer of 2014.  Classes use Dill for various activities, such as paired conversations, listen and repeat exercises, interpersonal dialogues, oral presentations, and speaking exams all in the effort to increase oral proficiency.

For instructors, the software is very easy to use. As students log in, they appear as an icon on the instructor’s lab controller. Instructors can group students (in pairs, usually) for conversations simply by drawing a line between the students. To make sure students remain on task, instructors can monitor or converse with students by drawing a line between them. Activities can be recorded by the instructor initiating a recording task and assigning it to the class. For individual recordings, students have a recorder with a simple interface. All recordings are saved automatically, and instructors access them via a web interface.

In the Spring 2016 semester to date, 26 instructors representing a number of different foreign languages have brought their classes to the lab to use Dill. Students have reacted positively. Many students prefer being recorded in a booth with a noise isolating headset while speaking instead of having to perform in front of their peers. This allows them to consider their speech instead of possibly being self-conscious, and as a result they tend to generate more speech. Not being able to see the person they are speaking with also allows students to focus on what they’re saying and not their body language.

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BU hosts Northeast US AAEEBL Conference

February 26th, 2015 in Announcements, e-Portfolio, General Studies

North America’s leading association for ePortfolios, AAEEBL (Association for Authentic, Experiential and Evidence-Based Learning) is holding its 2015 Northeast regional meeting right on the Boston University campus, through the College of General Studies, on March 12. Come and learn about different approaches to ePortfolios in education. If you would like the world to know about your ideas or experiences on ePortfolios, there is even room left for new presentations; the proposal deadline (listed as February 9 on the site) has been extended to February 28. You can find out more and register through the conference website. (There is a registration fee to attend.)

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School of Social Work wins Platinum Award for distance learning

May 8th, 2014 in Announcements, Case Studies, Online and Blended Learning, Social Work

The Boston University School of Social Work (BUSSW) was recognized by the United States Distance Learning Association (USDLA) with a Platinum Award for Best Practices in Distance Learning Programming. The USDLA, a nonprofit association and national leader in distance learning, presented its 2014 International Distance Learning Awards on May 5, 2014, in conjunction with its 2014 National Conference in St. Louis, Missouri. More

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Four BU MOOCs open for registration

February 26th, 2014 in Announcements, College of Arts & Sciences, edX, General Studies, MOOC, Online and Blended Learning

Registration for BU’s first four MOOCs (massive open online courses) opened on edx.org on 2/25. The four BU courses — Sabermetrics 101 (Andy Andres),  War for the Greater Middle East (Andrew Bacevich), The Art of Poetry (Robert Pinsky) & Alien Worlds —  join the ranks of those offered by a select group of universities on the Harvard & MIT-founded platform, and hope to appeal to tens of thousands learners around the globe by offering a taste of some of BU’s best.

Supported by BU’s Digital Learning Initiative, MOOCs are a part of a larger campus-wide effort to encourage and support innovative faculty-driven projects in digital learning. As the DLI team wrote in a recent article in InsideHigherEd, now is the time to ask bold questions about the value of residential and online learning, about regional and interdisciplinary pedagogical cooperation, and meaningful metrics about students’ opportunities, agency and resilience in the higher ed ecosystem. It is our hope that MOOCs can be both an active part of and catalyst for engaging with these queries and their complex answers.

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Digication interview with Professor Joseph Bizup

December 16th, 2013 in Case Studies, College of Arts & Sciences, Digication, e-Portfolio

Joseph Bizup, Director of BU’s CAS Writing Program, was recently featured in the monthly newsletter for Digication, the ePortfolio software BU uses. We’re including the text of the interview here, by kind permission of Digication:

Professor Joseph Bizup is currently Associate Professor in the Department of English at Boston University, and Assistant Dean and Director of the CAS Writing Program. His outstanding career encompasses distinguished scholarly contributions to literary criticism and rhetorical theory, as well as academic service positions, and writing program administration in some of the country’s most prestigious institutions: Yale University (97-99, 2001-2002), Columbia University (2002-2008), Boston University (2008-present).

Digication Learning Director: Professor Bizup, let’s start by talking a bit about your career’s trajectory. You started as a scholar of Victorian literature, but your research took you close to questions about technology, and the ways in which technology is relevant to human culture more generally. You discussed the often-invoked divide between technology and culture, and explained how the opposition can be dissolved. These questions are more than relevant in the present cultural and educational context. Could you tell our readers how you see the current interplay between technology and culture in general, and especially, what you consider to be the benefits of technology for humanistic education? More

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