Subscribe!

April 17th, 2013 in Announcements, Blogging, WordPress

Are you interested in educational technology at BU but can’t come to regularly check the blog page? We’ve had our Twitter feed @edtechbu up as one way to keep up, but now there’s another way. If you scroll down to the lower right on this site, you’ll see new Subscribe options available where you can subscribe to our announcements, case studies, or some of our most popular genres of technology. Click on the Email option to have new posts delivered to your email inbox. (If you use an RSS reader, you can also receive new posts that way.)

These subscriptions are made possible by Google’s FeedBurner service. You can use FeedBurner on your BU WordPress websites as well.

By

Using Facebook productively in class: Sophie Godley

April 16th, 2013 in Case Studies, Facebook, Public Health, Social Media

Sophie Godley often begins the semester in her community-health class by setting ground rules, including expectations for electronic media. She gently teases students that perhaps they can spare an hour or two away from communicating with others, with particular reference to Facebook, and instead focus on themselves and their learning. During one of these conversations, it struck her that Facebook also had potential as a positive learning resource. Prof. Godley’s students often emailed her links to articles relevant to the current class’s material, and she thought that Facebook offered an easy way for them to share those articles with each other directly.

In fall 2012, she created Facebook pages for her classes at both undergraduate and graduate levels, which she invited students to “like”. She made it clear that students did not have to be her Facebook “friend”, and that participation in the page was voluntary. She has now started three different pages for the three classes she teaches, and has reached 462 students. In addition to generating student content and discussion, past and present students can interact on the page. Prof. Godley can post jobs and internships, and include both current and former students. She can also ask questions about articles and generate back-and-forth in the comments. She has also found it “relatively painless” to manage the Facebook pages, compared to many other administrative tasks of teaching.

By