Political Communication

Political communication research addresses the strategic use of information to influence political attitudes and behaviors. The field explores the production of information via news media and political actors, the transmission of information through agenda setting and social networks, and the effects of information on public discourse and civil behavior. CRC researchers specialize in studying campaign rhetoric, democratic use of communication technologies, candidate images, politically-oriented public relations, international news flow, and the role of social media in politics, using a range of qualitative and quantitative methods such as rhetorical and historical analyses, surveys, and computational methods to analyze big data.


2019

Al-Rawi, A., Groshek, J., Zhang, L. (2019). What the fake? Assessing the extent of networked political spamming and bots in the propagation of #fakenews on Twitter. Online Information Review. (link)

Bucy, E. P., Foley, J., Lukito, J., Doroshenko, L., Shah, D. V., Pevehouse, J., & Wells, C. (2019, May). Performing populism: Trump’s transgressive debate style and the dynamics of Twitter response. Presented at the 69th Annual Conference of the International Communication Association, Washington, D.C.

Elasmar, M. (2019, May). Validity and reliability challenges when extracting public opinion trends from social media expressions. Presented at the 69th Annual Conference of the International Communication Association, Washington, D.C.

Guo, L. (2019). Ignorance or uncertainty: How the “black box” dilemma in big data research may “misinform” political communication. In N. Stroud & S. McGregor (Eds), Digital discussions: How Big Data Informs Political Communication. New York: Routledge. (link)

Guo, L. (2019, May). Social media use for news, citizenship norms, and online political participation: Examining a dual-path participation model in China. Presented at the 69th Annual Conference of the International Communication Association, Washington, D.C.

Guo, L., Chen, H., & Su, C. (2019, May). Network agenda setting, partisan selectivity, and opinion repertoire: an analysis of media effects on Hongkongers’ perception of Hong Kong-mainland china relationship. Presented at the 69th Annual Conference of the International Communication Association, Washington, D.C.

Krishna, A., & Kim, S. (2019, May). Speaking out in echo chambers: President Trump’s supporters’ communication behaviors on social media over a political controversy. Presented at the 69th Annual Conference of the International Communication Association, Washington, D.C.

Jaramillo, D. L. (2019, March). Twitter watchers: The care and feeding of MSNBC in the Trump era. Presented at the Society for Cinema and Media Studies Conference, Seattle, WA.

McCurdy, P., & Groshek, J. (2019). Bytes and Bitumen: Digital advocacy and mediated discourse around TransCanada’s proposed #EnergyEast pipeline. In M. Lalancette, V. Raynauld, and E. Crandall (Eds.), What’s #Trending In Canadian Politics? Understanding Transformations in Power, Media, and the Public Sphere. University of British Columbia Press. (link)

Rochefort, A. (2019, May). Regulating social media: A comparative policy analysis. Presented at the 69th Annual Conference of the International Communication Association, Washington, D.C.

Suk, J., Shah, D. V., Cramer, K., Friedland, L. A., Hughes, C., Wagner, M. W., & Wells, C. (2019, May). Do improving conditions harden partisan preferences? Communication, context, and political evaluations during periods of contention. Presented at the 69th Annual Conference of the International Communication Association, Washington, D.C.

Wertz, B., Groshek, J., & Rochefort, A. (2019, May). The humpty dumpty effect: Emerging media diffusion and (Granger) causal democratic change in 122 countries from 1946 to 2014. Presented at the 69th Annual Conference of the International Communication Association, Washington, D.C.

Zhang, Y. (2019, August). Contextualizing connective actions in proactive authoritarian regimes in digital era: #MiTu movement in China. Panel to be presented at the 102nd Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Conference, Toronto, Canada.

 

2018

Al-Rawi, A., & Groshek, J. (2018). Jihadist propaganda on social media. International Journal of Cyber Warfare and Terrorism. (link)

Amazeen, M.A., Vargo, C., & Hopp, T. (2018). Reinforcing attitudes in a gatewatching news era: Individual-level antecedents to sharing fact-checks on social media. Communication Monographs. Advance online publication. (link)

Cahill, T. J., Cutino, C., Forman, R., & Wang, Y. (2018, April). #GunControl: An analysis of hashtags used by political advocacy groups on Twitter. Presented at the 109th Annual Convention of the Eastern Communication Association, Pittsburgh, PA.

Downes, E. (2018, February). Fighting fake news: The latest on President Trump and Congress. Lasell College Graduate Communication Guest Lecture Series.

Groshek, J., Ogan, C., and Kiran, S. (2018). Development institutions. In W. Donsbach (Ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Communication. Wiley-Blackwell. (link)

Guo, L., Rohde, J., & Wu, H.D. (2018, July). Who is responsible for Twitter’s echo chamber problem? Evidence from 2016 U.S. election networks. Information, Communication & Society. Advance online publication. (link)

Guo, L. (2018, May). The rise of non-official voices in China: Intermedia agenda setting in a controlled media environment. Paper presented at the 68th annual conference of the International Communication Association, Prague, Czech Republic.

Guo, L., & Vargo, C. (2018). “Fake news” and emerging online media ecosystem: An integrated intermedia agenda-setting analysis of the 2016 U.S. Presidential election. Communication Research. Advance online publication. (link)

Jaramillo, D. L. (2018, September). Social Media and the unyielding flow of cable news in the age of Trump. Presented at Flow 2018: Precarity, Preservation, Praxis, Austin, TX.

Krishna, A., Connaughton, S. L., & Linabary, J. R. (2018, May). Citizens’ political public relations: Theorizing and explicating a new concept integrating political public relations, public diplomacy, and second track diplomacy. Presented at the 68th annual pre-conference of the International Communication Association, Prague, Czech Republic.

Krishna, A., Kim, S., Brodey, C., & Vibber, K.S. (2018, March). Treating Ivanka unfairly: Understanding the impact of presidential tweeting on publics’ perceptions and intentions to boycott corporations. Paper presented at the annual International Public Relations Research Conference, Orlando, FL.

Krongard, S., & Groshek, J. (2018). Streaming apolitical content and talking politics: Social television in the shaping of online and offline political talk during the 2016 campaign. In D. Shill and J.A Hendricks (Eds.), Media and the 2016 Election: Discourse, Disruption, and Digital Democracy: Routledge.

Seaton, K., & Wu, H. D. (2018, May). Making war or peace with emotion: Linking presidential speech, news coverage, and public opinion in the Iraq and Iran cases. Paper presented at the 68th annual conference of the International Communication Association, Prague, Czech Republic.

Vigil, T. R. (2018, April). Michelle and Melania: Depictions of future first ladies during presidential campaigns. Presented at the Midwest Political Science Association annual conference in Chicago, IL.

Vigil, T. R. (2018, April). Politics of the gendered body. Scheduled panel chair and discussant at the Midwest Political Science Association annual conference in Chicago, IL.

Waldherr, A., & Guo, L. (2018, May). Wave of opportunity: Frame networks of political challengers and news media during a food scandal. Paper presented at the 68th annual conference of the International Communication Association, Prague, Czech Republic.

Xie, X., Zhang, Y., & Bo, X. (2018, May). The imbalance of online media platforms utilization at county level in China: Opportunities and challenges. Paper presented at the 68th annual post-conference of the International Communication Association, Prague, Czech Republic.

Zhang, Y., & Vigil, T. (2018, May). Propaganda or persuasion: Mass entrepreneurship and innovation campaign in China. Paper presented at the 68th annual conference of the International Communication Association, Prague, Czech Republic.

 

2017

Bucy, E., & Groshek, J. (2017). Empirical support for the media participation hypothesis: Longitudinal trends across presidential elections, 1992 to 2012. New Media & Society, 20(5), 1889-1909. (link)

Downes, E. J. (2017, July). The United States Congress and its evolution through cyberspace: The history of a communication management revolution led by Capitol Hill’s press secretaries. Paper presented at the International History of Public Relations Conference, Bournemouth, England.

Downes, E. (2017, April). Trumpian public relations. BU Washington, D.C. Abroad Program. Washington, D.C.

Elasmar, M., & Groshek, J. (2017). An historical overview and future directions in the conceptualization of country images. In J. Fullerton and A. Kendrick (Eds.), Reader in Place Branding and Public Diplomacy: The Model of Country Concept (pp. 27-38). Peter Lang. (link)

Groshek, J., Guo, L., Cutino, C., & Elasmar, M. (2017). A sample methodology for extracting and interpreting country concept from social media users and content. In J. Fullerton and A. Kendrick (Eds.), Reader in Place Branding and Public Diplomacy: The Model of Country Concept (pp. 77-94). Peter Lang. (link)

Groshek, J., & Koc-Michalska, K. (2017). Helping populism win? Social media activity, passivity, and aggressiveness in supporting presidential candidates in the 2016 US election campaign. Information, Communication & Society, 20(9), 1389-1407. (link)

Groshek, J. (2017, December). An (un)civil movement? How mobile phones and social media change discourse. Featured speaker, Boston University Race, Politics, and Social Media Symposium.

Groshek, J. (2017, November). Helping populism win? Social media use, filter bubbles, and support for populist presidential candidates in the 2016 U.S. election campaign. Featured speaker, NULab/Shorenstein Center.

Groshek, J. & Koc-Michalska, K. (2017, September). Helping populism win? Social media use, filter bubbles, and support for populist presidential candidates in the 2016 US election campaign. Presented to the American Political Science Association, San Francisco, CA.

Groshek, J. & Krongard, S. (2017, September). Streaming entertainment and talking politics: Social television in the shaping of online and offline political talk during the 2016 campaign. Presented to the Digital Media, Political Participation and Challenges to Democracy conference, Vienna, Austria.

Groshek, J. (2017, August). The Netflix effect: How streaming television and binge-watching are shaping political attitudes, perceptions of risk, cultivation of empathy, and educational achievement. Presented to the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Chicago, IL.

Groshek, J., Guo, L., Donegan, J., Katz, J., & Lin, Q. (2017, May). Network agenda setting gone mobile: Incivility as the norm in #election2016. Presented at the International Communication Association, San Diego, CA.

Groshek, J., Guo, L., Katz, J., & Wu, D. (2017, May). Network agenda setting gone mobile: Implications of interface and place in #election2016. Paper presented at the 67th annual conference of the International Communication Association, San Diego, CA.

Groshek, J. (2017, February). The role of media in recent elections, and the future of democracy in the digital age. Invited Speaker. Institut des Hautes Etudes de l’Entreprise. Boston, MA.

Guo, L. (2017). WeChat as a semi-public alternative sphere: Exploring the use of WeChat among Chinese older adults. International Journal of Communication, 11, 21. (link)

Guo, L., Mays, K., & Wang, J. (2017). Whose story wins on Twitter? Visualizing the South China Sea Dispute. Journalism Studies, 1-22. (link)

Guo, L. & Vargo, C. (2017). Global intermedia agenda setting: A big data analysis of international news flow. Journal of Communication, 67(4), 499-520. (link)

Guo, L. (2017, November). Using computational methods to advance agenda-setting theory: An intermedia agenda-setting analysis of Chinese online mediascape. Paper presented the Future of Media and Communication Research Conference, Shanghai.

Guo, L. (2017, November). WeChat as a semi-public alternative sphere: Exploring the use of WeChat among Chinese older adults. Invited talk at Fudan University, Shanghai.

Katz, J. E., & Crocker, E. T. (2017, March). Is fake news a continuation of politics by other means? Seminar “Journée d’études: Post-vérité et Web.” Collège d’études mondiales, Fondation Maison des sciences de l’homme, Paris, France.

Krishna, A. (2017). Motivation with misinformation: Conceptualizing lacuna individuals and publics as knowledge deficient, issue-negative activists. Journal of Public Relations Research, 29, 176-193. (link)

Mays, K., & Groshek, J. (2017). A time–series, multinational analysis of democratic forecasts and (Web 2.0) Internet diffusion. International Journal of Communication, 11, 429-451. (link)

Medeiros, M., & Cummings, J.. (2017, May). Polarization and technological selective exposure: A new exploration of de facto selective exposure. Paper presented at the 67th annual conference of the International Communication Association, San Diego, CA.

Vigil, T. R. (2017, May). Women as citizens: The emergence and entrenchment of Republican motherhood rhetoric. Presented at the International Communication Association annual conference in San Diego, CA.

Wertz, B., & Groshek, J. (2017, October). Emerging media, instability, and democracy: Examining the granger-causal relationships of 122 Countries from 1946 to 2014. Presented to the Association of Internet Researchers, Tartu, Estonia.

Wu, H. D., & Guo, L. (2017). Beyond salience transmission: Linking agenda networks between media and voters. Communication Research. (link)

Wu, H. D. (2017, May). Risks of sea-level change delivered in governmental communications and news media. Paper presented at the 67th annual ICA preconference on Strategic Environmental Communication and Exploration of Research in Crisis, Risk, and Disaster, San Diego, CA.

Zhang, Y. (2017). The imbalance of online media platforms utilization at the county level in China: Opportunities and challenges. Presented at the International Emerging Media Forum, Beijing, PRC.

 

2016

Breuer, A., & Groshek, J. (2016). Assessing the potential of ICTs for participatory development in Sub-Saharan Africa with evidence from urban Togo. International Journal of Politics, Culture, and Society, 30(4), 349-368. (link)

Downes, E. (2016, May). Four (powerful) questions about the U.S. House of Representatives’ communication mangers (and a dirty little secret). Presented at the 2016 International Conference on Communication, Media, and Technology in Zagreb, Croatia.

Downes, E. (2016, May). The history of the adoption and diffusion of new media—with a public relations emphasis—and a congressional focus. Presented at the 2016 International History of Public Relations Conference in Bournemouth, England.

Elasmar, M.G.. & Groshek, J. (2016). The cognitive concept of country image. In J. Fullerton & A. Kendrik (Eds.), Reader on Nation Branding and Public Diplomacy: The Model of Country Concept. Peter Lang Publishers.

Groshek, J., & Christensen, B. (2016). Emerging media and press freedoms as determinants of nonviolent and violent political conflicts, 1990–2006. International Communication Gazette, 79(4), 335-356. (link)

Groshek, J., & Cutino, C. (2016). Meaner on mobile: Incivility and impoliteness in communicating contentious politics on sociotechnical networks. Social Media + Society, 2(4). (link)

Groshek, J., & Holt, L.F. (2016). When official consensus equals more negativity in media coverage: Broadcast television news and the (re-)indexing of the ‘Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell’ repeal. Media, War & Conflict, 1-19. (link)

Groshek, J., & Krongard, S. (2016). Netflix and engage? Implications for streaming television on political participation during the 2016 US presidential campaign. Social Sciences, 5(4), 65. (link)

Jaramillo, D. L. (2016, October.) TV’s War on Drugs: Local crises as public service crusades in the 1980s. Presented at the Television History, the Peabody Archives, and Cultural Memory Symposium at the University of Georgia.

Jin, C. & Guo, L. (2016). Chinese “Tongzhi” community, civil society and online activism. Communication and the Public, 1(4), 504-508. (link)

Tsay-Vogel, M., Kundargi, R., & Gopal, S. (2016, August). Effects of perceived scientific literacy and spatial proximity of global climate change events on viewers. Presented in the NSF GK-12 GLACIER Summer Workshop, Boston University, Boston, MA.

Vargo, C. & Guo, L. (2016). Networks, big data, and intermedia agenda-setting: an analysis of traditional, partisan, and emerging online U.S. news. Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, 94(4), 1031-1055. (link)

Wu, H. D., Groshek, J., & Elasmar, M. G. (2016). Which countries does the world talk about? An examination of factors that shape country presence on Twitter. International Journal of Communication, 10, 18. (link)

 

2015

Al-Rawi, A. & Groshek, J. (2015). Arab Iranians and their social media use. CyberOrient: Online Journal for the Virtual Middle East, 9(2). (link)

Downes, E. (2015, July). The history of Capitol Hill’s press secretaries: Helping members of Congress ‘look good” for almost 50 years. Presented at the International Public Relations History Conference in Bournemouth, Great Britain.

Downes, E. (2015, May). ‘Spinning’ the world—from Capitol Hill?. Presented at the International Conference on Communication, Media, Technology and Design in Dubai, UAE.

Downes, E. (2015, April). Defending democracy’s ‘Spin Doctors’: The (ultimate) role of Congress’ press secretaries. Presented at the Association for Core Texts and Courses Conference, Plymouth, MA.

Groshek, J., & Al-Rawi, A. (2015). Anti-austerity in the Euro crisis: Modeling protest movements through online-mobile-social media use and content. International Journal of Communication, 9, 3280-3303. (link)

Groshek, J. (2015). Development institutions. In W. Donsbach (Ed.), The Concise Encyclopedia of Communication. Wiley-Blackwell.

Groshek, J., Elasmar, M., & Wu, D. (2015, February). Predictors of country mentions in the Twittersphere: Social media as a new context for the study of country images. Presented at the International Studies Association annual convention in New Orleans, LA.

Guo, L. (2015). Exploring the link between community radio and the community: A study of audience participation in alternative media practices. Communication, Culture & Critique, 10(1), 112-130. (link)

Guo, L., & Vargo, C. (2015, May). The power of ‘issue ownership network’: A big-data analysis of the 2012 U.S. presidential election. Presented at the International Communication Association in San Juan, Puerto Rico.

Guo, L. (2015, April). Digital technology and governance in China today. Presented on a panel sponsored by Boston University’s Center for the Study of Asia and College of Communication.

Vigil, T. R. (2015). Conquering constraints and expanding ethos: FDR’s 1932 Commonwealth Club Address.  Studies in Media and Communication, 3(1), 62-72. (link)

Vigil, T. R. (2015). Conventional and unconventional rhetorical strategies: Michelle Obama’s 2008 and 2012 Democratic National Convention Addresses. In E. Natalle & J. Simon (Eds.), Michelle Obama: First Lady, American Rhetor. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books. (link)

Wu, D., Groshek, J., & Elasmar, M. (2015, May). Which countries does the world talk about? Exploring the impact of national attributes, resources, and contexts on country presence on Twitter. Presented at the International Communication Association in San Juan, Puerto Rico.

 

2014

Breuer, A., & Groshek, J. (2014). Online media and offline empowerment in democratic transition: Linking forms of Internet use with political attitudes and behaviors in post-rebellion Tunisia. Journal of Information Technology and Policy, 11(1), 25-44. (link)

Breuer, A., & Groshek, J. (2014). Slacktivism or efficiency-increased activism? Online political participation and the Brazilian Ficha Limpa Anti-Corruption Campaign. In Y. Welp & A. Breuer (Eds.), Digital Opportunities for Democratic Governance in Latin America (pp. 165-182). Routledge. (link)

Downes, E. (2014, June.) The (very deep) evolution of the Congressional press secretary and the importance (or lack thereof) of an informed democracy. Presented at the annual International History of Public Relations Conference in Bornemouth, England.

Downes, E. (2014, April.) Press secretary: The story of Capitol Hill’s image makers. Delivered as part of a speaker series for graduate students in Communications at Lasell College.

Downes, E. (2014, March.) The evolution of the Congressional press secretary… as public relations practitioner?. Presented at the annual International Public Relations Research Conference in Miami, FL.

Engelbert, J., & Groshek, J. (2014). Populism as PR: An international perspective of public diplomacy trends. In G. Golan, S. Yang, & D. Kinsey (Eds.), International Public Relations and Public Diplomacy: Communication and Engagement (pp. 331- 345). Peter Lang Publishing. (link)

Groshek, J., & Bachman, I. (2014). A Latin Spring? Examining digital diffusion and youth bulges in forecasting political change in Latin America. In Y. Welp & A. Breuer (Eds.), Digital Opportunities for Democratic Governance in Latin America (pp. 17-32). Routledge. (link)

Groshek, J. (2014). Development institutions. In W. Donsbach (Ed.), The Concise Encyclopedia of Communication. Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

Groshek, J., & Brookes, S. (2014). YouTube/OurTube/TheirTube: Official and unofficial online campaign advertising, negativity, and popularity. In J. A. Hendricks & D. Shill (Eds.), Presidential Campaigning and Social Media (pp. 140-153). Oxford University Press. (link)

Lambert, C. A. & Wu, H. D.. (2014). Influencing forces or mere interview sources? How key constituencies shaped health care media discourse. Health Marketing Quarterly, 31(4), 312-325. (link)

Vigil, T. R. (2014). Feminine views in the feminine style: Convention speeches by presidential nominees’ spouses. Southern Communication Journal, 79(4), 327-346. (link)

Vigil, T. (2014, November). Telling personal tales: The use of narratives in convention speeches by nominees’ wives. Presented at the annual convention of the National Communication Association in Chicago, IL.

Wu, H. D., & Coleman, R. (2014). The affective effect on political judgment: Comparing the influences of candidate attributes and issue congruence. Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, 91(3), 530-543. (link)

Wu, D. (2014, May.) A gridlock scenario of political communication: Partisan media, selective exposure, and agenda setting effect. Presented at the International Communication Association conference in Seattle, WA.

 

2013

Groshek, J. & Al-Rawi, A. (2013). Public sentiment and critical framing in social media content during the 2012 U.S. presidential campaign. Social Science Computer Review, 31(5), 563-576. (link)

Groshek, J., & Dimitrova, D. (2013). A cross section of political involvement, partisanship and online media in middle America during the 2008 presidential campaign. Atlantic Journal of Communication, 21(2), 108-124. (link)

Groshek, J., & Holt, L. (2013, August). “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” reporting: Examining broadcast network news coverage and indexing of a national debate over time. Presented at the 96th annual Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication convention in Washington D.C. (Top Faculty Paper in the Electronic News Division.)

Groshek, J., & Brookes, S. (2013, August). YouTube/OurTube/TheirTube: Official and unofficial online campaign advertising, negativity, and popularity. Presented at the 96th annual Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication convention in Washington D.C.

Vigil, T. (2013). George W. Bush’s first three inaugural addresses: Testing the utility of the inaugural genre. Southern Communication Journal, 78(5), 427-446. (link)

Vigil, T. (2013, November.) Rhetorically constructing connections: Strategies for enhancing identifications in the 2008 and 2012 nomination acceptance addresses. Presented at the National Communication Association conference in Washington, D.C.

Vigil, T. (2013, April). Rhetorically constructed consubstantiality: The importance of candidate identification building strategies in contemporary nomination acceptance addresses. Presented at the annual Midwest Political Science Association national conference in Chicago.

 

2012

Kim, S., Shanahan, J., & Choi, D. (2012). TV news framing supports societal poverty solutions. Newspaper Research Journal, 33(1), 101-112. (link)

 

2011

Kim, S. H., Scheufele, D., Shanahan, J., & Choi, D. H. (2011). Deliberation in spite of controversy? News media and the public’s evaluation of a controversial issue in South Korea. Journalism and Mass Communication Quarterly, 88(2), 320-336. (link)

 

2010

Wu, H. D., & Dahmen, N. S. (2010). Web sponsorship and campaign effects: Assessing the difference between positive and negative Web sites. Journal of Political Marketing, 9(4), 1-16. (link)