Media Entertainment

Media entertainment research examines the consumption of and engagement with popular culture, including TV, film, games, and fandom. The field uses a variety of qualitative and quantitative methods to analyze the motivations underlying entertainment media consumption, the content of popular media, the processes underlying involvement with narratives, and the consequences of such experiences. CRC researchers specialize in critical analysis of film and TV, ironic consumption, parasocial interactions with media figures, morality, media enjoyment and emotion, and inspirational media.


2019

Hair, L., & Tsay-Vogel, M. (2019, May). When enough is enough: Coping with media stressors and implications for media (dis)engagement. Presented at the 69th Annual Conference of the International Communication Association, Washington, D.C.

Tsay-Vogel, M., & Krakowiak, K. M. (2019). The virtues and vices of social comparisons: examining assimilative and contrastive emotional reactions to characters in a narrative. Motivation and Emotion, 43(4), 636-647. (link)

 

2018

Andersen, B., Chen, M., Wang, D., Zhang, Y., & Tsay-Vogel, M. (2018, May). Media-induced empowerment: Effects of episodic and thematic framing of hedonic and eudaimonic messages on viewers. Paper presented at the 68th annual conference of the International Communication Association, Prague, Czech Republic.

Cahill, T.J. (2018, October). The structural role of user class in chat interactions on Twitch. Paper presented at the 2018 Annual Conference of the Association of Internet Researchers, Montreal Canada.

Hair, L., & Cahill, T. J. (2018, May). Cognitive and emotional responses to visual and gender cues in video game livestreaming. Poster presented at the 68th annual conference of the International Communication Association, Prague, Czech Republic.

Howell, C. (2018, March). Collecting and recollecting: Battlestar Galactica through video’s varied technologies of memory. Presented at the BU Cinema and Media Studies Program and Boston Cinema/Media Seminar.

Krakowiak, K. M., & Tsay-Vogel, M. (2018). Are good characters better for us? The effect of morality salience on entertainment selection and recovery outcomes. Mass Communication and Society, 21(3), 320-344. (link)

Krongard, S., & Groshek, J. (2018). Streaming apolitical content and talking politics: Social television in the shaping of online and offline political talk during the 2016 campaign. In D. Shill and J.A Hendricks (Eds.), Media and the 2016 Election: Discourse, Disruption, and Digital Democracy: Routledge. (link)

Krongard, S., & Tsay-Vogel, M. (2018). Online original TV series: Examining portrayals of violence in popular binge-watched programs and social reality perceptions. Psychology of Popular Media Culture. (link)

Oppliger, P. A., & Medeiros, M. (2018). A different kind of foster family: Portrayals of teen foster care on Freeform. In E. L. Newman & E. Witsell (Eds.), ABC Family/Freeform and its Programming. Jefferson, NC: McFarland.

Tsay-Vogel, M., Shanahan, J. E., & Signorielli, N. (2018). Social media cultivating perceptions of privacy: A five-year longitudinal analysis of privacy attitudes and self-disclosure behaviors among Facebook users. New Media & Society, 20(1), 141-161. (link)

Wang, D., & Tsay-Vogel, M. (2018, May). Examining perceptions of the impact of social media on selfie behaviors: A third-person effect perspective. Paper presented at the 68th annual conference of the International Communication Association, Prague, Czech Republic.

Wertz, B., & Zhong, Q. (2018, May). Learning, doing, flow, and fun: Understanding relationships between difficulty, enjoyment and skill development in games. Poster to be presented at the 68th annual conference of the International Communication Association, Prague, Czech Republic.

 

2017

Groshek, J. (2017, August). Streaming content (and relationships) to life: Social television in the shaping of online and offline human interactions. Presented at the annual convention of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Chicago, IL.

Groshek, J. (2017, August). The Netflix effect: How streaming television and binge-watching are shaping political attitudes, perceptions of risk, cultivation of empathy, and educational achievement. Presented to the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Chicago, IL.

Groshek, J., & Zhang, Y. (2017, May). Does streaming online television hurt college students’ academic performance & personal health? Survey evidence. Paper presented at the 67th annual conference of the International Communication Association, San Diego, CA.

Gui, M., Shanahan, J., Tsay-Vogel, M., & Stanca, L. (2017, May). Surfing in Funland: Digital overabundance, media consumption, and choice satisfaction. Paper presented at the 67th annual conference of the International Communication Association, San Diego, CA.

Howell, C. (2017, July). Nostalgic containment of female superheroes. Presented at Console-ing Passions Conference, Greenville, NC.

Krakowiak, K. M., & Tsay-Vogel, M. (2017). Are good characters better for us? The effect of morality salience on entertainment selection and recovery outcomes. Mass Communication and Society, 21(3), 320-344. (link)

Krongard, S., & Tsay-Vogel, M. (2017, May). Binging violence: Online original TV series cultivating social reality perceptions. Poster presented at the 67th annual conference of the International Communication Association, San Diego, CA.

Tsay-Vogel, M., & Krakowiak, K. M. (2017). Exploring viewers’ responses to nine reality TV subgenres. Psychology of Popular Media Culture, 6(4), 348-360. (link)

Tsay-Vogel, M., & Sanders, M. S. (2017). Fandom and the search for meaning: Examining communal involvement with popular media beyond pleasure. Psychology of Popular Media Culture, 6(1), 32-47. (link)

Tsay-Vogel, M., Lin, H. F., & Tsai, H. Y. (2017, May). Prosocial effects of social TV behaviors on viewers’ sense of community. Paper presented at the 67th annual conference of the International Communication Association, San Diego, CA.

Tsay-Vogel, M. (2017, April). The power of entertainment: How media appreciation fosters elevation, altruism, and sense of community. Presented in the Department of Communication, University of Buffalo, Buffalo, NY.

 

2016

Jaramillo, D. L.  (2016). Generation Kill: The Invasion of Iraq as seen on HBO.  In D. Cunningham & J. Nelson (Eds.), The Wiley-Blackwell Companion to the War Film (pp. 305-319).  Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell. (link)

Jaramillo, D. L. (2016, March). Violence, drug wars, and quality television drama: The industrial, formal, and intertextual value of Netflix’s Narcos. Presented at Page-Barbour Conference, “The Drug Wars in the Americas: Culture and Histories, ” University of Virginia. March 3-4, 2016.

Jaramillo, D. L. (2016, March). Kingpins no more: The evolving Mexican narco on U.S. television. Presented at Society for Cinema and Media Studies Conference. Atlanta, GA.

Kim, J., & Tsay-Vogel, M. (2016). Enjoyment and appreciation as motivators for coping: Exploring the therapeutic effects of media messages on perceived threat. International Journal of Communication, 10, 1786-1808. (link)

Krakowiak, K. M., & Tsay-Vogel, M. (2016, June). Are good characters better for us? The effect of morality salience on entertainment selection and recovery outcomes. Paper presented at the 66th annual conference of the International Communication Association, Fukuoka, Japan.

Sanders, M. S., & Tsay-Vogel, M. (2016). Beyond heroes and villains: Examining explanatory mechanisms underlying moral disengagement. Mass Communication and Society, 19, 230-252. (link)

Tsay-Vogel, M. (2016). Me versus them: Third-person effects among Facebook users. New Media & Society, 18(9), 1956-1972. (link)

Tsay-Vogel, M., & Krakowiak, K. M. (2016). Inspirational reality TV: The prosocial effects of lifestyle transforming reality programs on elevation and altruism. Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media, 60(4), 567-586. (link)

Tsay-Vogel, M., & Krakowiak, K. M. (2016). Effects of hedonic and eudaimonic motivations on film enjoyment through moral disengagement. Communication Research Reports, 33(1), 54-60. (link)

Tsay-Vogel, M., & Krakowiak, K. M. (2016, November). Investigating the role of morality salience: How moral self-perceptions impact media selection and responses. Presented at the 102nd annual convention of the National Communication Association, Philadelphia, PA.

Tsay-Vogel, M. (2016, September). Breaking news: Identity, violence, and the media. Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, MA.

Tsay-Vogel, M. (2016, July). Beyond sheer entertainment: The psychology of social TV. Presented in the School of Journalism and Communication, Xiamen University, Xiamen, China.

Tsay-Vogel, M., & Krakowiak, K. M. (2016, June). The virtues and vices of social comparisons: Examining assimilative and contrastive emotional reactions to media characters. Paper presented at the 66th annual conference of the International Communication Association, Fukuoka, Japan.

 

2015

Krakowiak, K., M., & Tsay-Vogel, M. (2015). The dual role of morally ambiguous characters: Examining the effect of morality salience on narrative responses. Human Communication Research, 41(3), 390-411. (link)

Jaramillo, D. L. (2015). Astrological TV: The creation and destruction of a genre. Communication, Culture, and Critique, 8(2), 309-326. (link)

Oppliger, P. A., & Davis, A. (2015). Portrayals of bullying: A content analysis of picture books for preschoolers. Early Childhood Education Journal, 44(5), 515-526. (link)

Oppliger, P., & Davis, A. (2015, April.) How to read a bully: A content analysis of bullying in children’s picture books. Presented at the Popular Culture Association Conference in New Orleans, LA.

Reeves, B., Cummings, J. J., Scarborough, J. K., & Yeykelis, L. (2015). Increasing energy efficiency with entertainment media an experimental and field test of the influence of a social game on performance of energy behaviors. Environment and Behavior, 47(1), 102-115. (link)

Tsay-Vogel, M., & Nabi, R. L. (2015). The power of positive action: Exploring the role of participatory behaviors through the lens of the tripartite model of media enjoyment. Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media, 59(4), 658-678. (link)

Tsay-Vogel, M. (2015, June). The synergistic power of television and social media: Examining the evolution of social TV. Presented in the Department of Communication & Technology at National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu City, Taiwan.

Tsay-Vogel, M. (2015, May). Psychological and social effects of social TV on audiences and recommendations for industry professionals. Presented in the Economics & Management School at Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications in Beijing, China.

Tsay-Vogel, M. (2015, May). Theoretical approaches to examining social TV and the increasing symbiotic relationship between TV and the web. Presented in the School of Journalism & Communication at Shanghai International Studies University in Shanghai, China.

Tsay-Vogel, M. (2015, March). Beyond sheer entertainment: The psychology of social TV and implications for TV marketing. Presented in the School of Economics and Management at Southwest Jiaotong University in Chengdu, China.

Vigil, T. R., & Wu, H. D. (2015). Facebook users’ engagement and perceived life satisfaction. Media and Communication, 3, 5-16. (link)

 

2014

Guo, L., & Harlow, S. (2014). User-generated racism: An analysis of stereotypes of African Americans, Latinos and Asians in YouTube videos. Howard Journal of Communication, 25, 281-302. (link)

Hartmann, T., Krakowiak, K. M., & Tsay-Vogel, M. (2014). How violent video games communicate violence: A literature review and content analysis of moral disengagement factors. Communication Monographs, 81(3), 310-332. (link)

Oppliger, P. & Summers, C. (2014, August). Who’s the bully?: Teaching about bullies in situation comedies. Presented at the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication in Montreal, Canada.

Oppliger, P. (2014, August). He said, she laughed: Sex differences in joke telling and humor appreciation. Presented at the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication in Montreal, Canada.

Oppliger, P. & Shouse, E. (2014, June.) Disposition theory and humor ratings of insensitive jokes. Presented at the International Society of Humor Studies Conference in Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Oppliger, P. & Shouse, E. (2014, March.) Disposition theory and humor ratings of insensitive jokes. Presented at the International Society of Humor Studies Conference in Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Tsay-Vogel, M., & Oliver, M. B. (2014). Is watching others self-disclose enjoyable? An examination of the effects of information delivery in entertainment media. Journal of Media Psychology, 26(3), 111-124. (link)

Tsay-Vogel, M., & Schwartz, M. L. (2014). Theorizing parasocial interactions based on authenticity: The development of a media figure classification scheme. Psychology of Popular Media Culture, 3(2), 66-78. (link)

Tsay-Vogel, M., & Sanders, M. (2014, May.) Fandom and its relationship to affective, cognitive, and behavioral audience responses: Examining the connection of fans to the world of Harry Potter. Presented at the International Communication Association conference in Seattle, WA.

Tsay-Vogel, M., & Sanders, M. (2014, May.) Exploring the moral continuum: Examining explanatory mechanisms underlying moral disengagement across characters of different moral complexities. Presented at the International Communication Association conference in Seattle, WA. (Top Faculty Paper Award in Mass Communication Division.)

 

2013

Bailey, E., Tsay-Vogel, M., Krakowiak, K. M., & Ivory, J. (2013, June). Effects of morally ambiguous character behavior on affective disposition, character perceptions and enjoyment. Presented at the 63rd annual conference of the International Communication Association in London, UK.

Grundmann, R. (2013, March.) Adorno, Ranciere, and cinematic spectatorship: Is spectatorial emancipation a relevant concept?. Presented at the Society for Cinema and Media Studies conference in Chicago, IL.

Grundmann, R. (2013, February). The films of Michael Haneke. Keynote speaker at the Istanbul Modern’s “All About Haneke” Retrospective in Istanbul, Turkey.

Jaramillo, D. L. (2013). Rescuing television from ‘The Cinematic’: The perils of dismissing television style. In J. Jacobs & S. Peacock (Eds.), Television Aesthetics and Style (pp. 67-75). London: Bloomsbury. (link)

Jaramillo, D. L. (2013). Narcocorridos and Newbie Drug Dealers: The changing image of the Mexican Narco on US television. Ethnic and Racial Studies, 37(9), 1587-1604. (link)

Jaramillo, D. L. (2013). AMC: Stumbling toward a new television canon. Television and New Media, 14(2), 167-183. (link)

Krakowiak, K. M., & Tsay-Vogel, M. (2013). What makes characters’ bad behaviors acceptable? The effects of character motivation and outcome on perceptions, character liking, and moral disengagement. Mass Communication and Society, 16(2), 179-199. (link)

Oppliger, P., Tamse, M., & Simon-Roberts, S. (2013, July.) White saviors: Joking about interracial adoptions and foster care in American situation comedies. Presented at the International Society of Humor Studies Conference, Williamsburg, VA.

Shouse, E., & Oppliger, P. A. (2013). Sarah is Magic: The (post-gendered?) comedy of Sarah Silverman. Comedy Studies, 3(2), 201-216. (link)

Tsay-Vogel, M. (2013, November.) Effects of television viewing, video game play, and social media use on perceptions of violence. Presented at the National Communication Association conference in Washington, D.C.

Tsay-Vogel, M., & Krakowiak, K. M. (2013, June). Responses to lifestyle transforming reality-based television: Appreciating human kindness, dignity, and compassion. Presented at the 63rd annual conference of the International Communication Association in London, UK.

 

2012

Jaramillo, D. L. (2012). 9/11 as Real Estate Tragedy: Selling New York and the future of the Financial District. Critical Studies in Television: An International Journal of Television Studies, 7(1), 79-98. (link)

Lambert, C. A. & White, C. (2012). Feminization of the film? Occupational roles of public relations characters in movies. PR Journal, 6(4), 1-24. (link)

Tsay-Vogel, M., & Bodine, B. (2012). Exploring parasocial interaction in college students as a multidimensional construct: Do personality, interpersonal need, and television motive predict their relationships with media characters?. Psychology of Popular Media Culture, 1(3), 185-200. (link)

 

2011

Lambert, C. A. (2011). Cinema spin: Exploring film depictions of public relations practitioners. Communication Teacher, 25(4), 205-211. (link)

Krakowiak, K. M., & Tsay-Vogel, M. (2011). The role of moral disengagement in the enjoyment of real and fictional characters. International Journal of Arts and Technology, 4(1), 90-101. (link)

Tsay-Vogel, M., & Krakowiak, K. M. (2011). The impact of perceived similarity and identification on moral disengagement. International Journal of Arts and Technology, 4(1), 102-110. (link)

 

2010

Dudo, A., Brossard, D., Shanahan, J., Scheufele, D. A., Morgan, M., & Signorielli, N. (2010). Science on television in the 21st century: Recent trends in portrayals and their contributions to public attitudes toward science. Communication Research, 38(6), 754-777. (link)

Jaramillo, D. (2010). It’s not all talk: Editing and storytelling in As The World Turns. In S. Ford, A. de Kosnik, & C. L. Harrington (Eds.), The Survival of Soap Opera: Strategies for a New Media Era. Jackson, MS: The University Press of Mississippi. (link)

Morgan, M. & Shanahan, J. (2010). The state of cultivation. Journal of Broadcasting and Electronic Media, 54(2), 337-355. (link)