Critical Cultural Studies

Critical cultural studies approach media in context of the broader cultures and power structures that surround it. Critical cultural scholars examine the production and legislation of media, media content and its relationship to cultural and political patterns and practices, and audience reception of media. CRC researchers specialize in television and film criticism, broadcast history and regulation, cultural depictions of bullying, ironic cultural consumption, and fandom studies.


2019

Jaramillo, D. L. (2019, March). Twitter watchers: The care and feeding of MSNBC in the Trump era. Presented at the Society for Cinema and Media Studies Conference, Seattle, WA.

Vigil, T. (2019, April). Melania and Michelle: Comparing contemporary First Ladies. Presented at the Midwest Political Science Association Conference, Chicago, Illinois.

 

2018

Donegan, J. (2018, May). The relationship between highbrow/lowbrow film viewership: A network analysis of European art cinema and paracinema. Paper presented at the 68th annual conference of the International Communication Association, Prague, Czech Republic.

Donegan, J. (2018, March). A Response to Netflix: Amazon’s digital distribution strategy and commitment to exhibitors. Presented at the Society of Cinema & Media Studies conference in Toronto, Canada.

Donegan, J. (2018, March). Cult fandom discourse on Twitter: The Room, The Disaster Artist, and the dilution of subcultural capital. Presented at the American Culture Association/Popular Culture Association conference in Indianapolis, IN.

Howell, C. (2018, March). Collecting and recollecting: Battlestar Galactica through video’s varied technologies of memory. Presented at the BU Cinema and Media Studies Program and Boston Cinema/Media Seminar.

Howell, C. (2018, March). Welcome to the fempire: The national women’s soccer league branding on Lifetime and Go90. Presented at Society for Cinema and Media Studies Conference, Toronto, Ontario, CA.

Jaramillo, D. L. (2018). NBC Sports Network: Building elite audiences from broadcast rights. In D. Johnson (Ed.), From networks to Netflix: A guide to changing channels, pp. 117-126. New York: Routledge. (link)

Jaramillo, D. L. (2018, April). The television code: Policing and containing an emerging medium, 1948-1952. Keynote Address at the Postwar Faculty Colloquium, University of North Texas.

Jaramillo, D. L. (2018, March). ‘The inherent artistic and highly individualistic nature of the work’: Salary stabilization and talent compensation in the 1950s. Paper presented at Society for Cinema and Media Studies Conference, Toronto, Ontario, CA.

Katz, J. E. (2018, April). The visual turn in mobile communication: Notes from the travel experience as seen through American eyes. Invited speaker, “Communication-culture-consciousness.” 8th Visual Learning Conference, Budapest, Hungary.

Oppliger, P. A., & Medeiros, M. (2018). A different kind of foster family: Portrayals of teen foster care on Freeform. In E. L. Newman & E. Witsell (Eds.), ABC Family/Freeform and its Programming. Jefferson, NC: McFarland.

Vigil, T. R. (2018, April). Michelle and Melania: Depictions of future first ladies during presidential campaigns. Presented at the Midwest Political Science Association annual conference in Chicago, IL.

Vigil, T. R. (2018, April). Politics of the gendered body. Scheduled panel chair and discussant at the Midwest Political Science Association annual conference in Chicago, IL.

 

2017

Donegan, J. (2017, March). Paracinematic viewership & the acquisition of subcultural capital via oppositional reading strategies. Consumer Identities & Digital Culture Symposium. St. John’s University. Queens, NY.

Howell, C. (2017). Symbolic capital and the production discourse of The American Music Show: A microhistory of Atlanta cable access. Cinema Journal, 57(1), 1-24. (link)

Howell, C. (2017, July). Nostalgic containment of female superheroes. Presented at Console-ing Passions Conference, Greenville, NC.

Tsay-Vogel, M., & Sanders, M. S. (2017). Fandom and the search for meaning: Examining communal involvement with popular media beyond pleasure. Psychology of Popular Media Culture, 6(1), 32-47. (link)

Vigil, T. R. (2017, May). Women as citizens: The emergence and entrenchment of Republican motherhood rhetoric. Presented at the International Communication Association annual conference in San Diego, CA.

 

2016

Fernández, R., & Jaramillo, D. L. (2016). ‘Salúd, Amigos’: Negotiating border history in rural and farm radio of the Rio Grande Valley. Journal of Radio & Audio Media, 23(2), 250-262. (link)

Jaramillo, D. L.  (2016). Generation Kill: The Invasion of Iraq as seen on HBO.  In D. Cunningham & J. Nelson (Eds.), The Wiley-Blackwell Companion to the War Film (pp. 305-319).  Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell. (link)

Jaramillo, D. L. (2016). The rise and fall of the Television Broadcasters Association, 1943-1951. Journal of e-Media Studies 5(1). (link)

Jaramillo, D. L. (2016, October.) TV’s War on Drugs: Local crises as public service crusades in the 1980s. Presented at the Television History, the Peabody Archives, and Cultural Memory Symposium at the University of Georgia.

Jaramillo, D. L. (2016, April). In pursuit of wholesome TV: The strange path to the television code. Presented at Screen Arts & Cultures Speaker Series, University of Michigan. April 7, 2016.

Jaramillo, D. L. (2016, March). Violence, drug wars, and quality television drama: The industrial, formal, and intertextual value of Netflix’s Narcos. Presented at Page-Barbour Conference, “The Drug Wars in the Americas: Culture and Histories, ” University of Virginia. March 3-4, 2016.

Jaramillo, D. L. (2016, March). Kingpins no more: The evolving Mexican narco on U.S. television. Presented at Society for Cinema and Media Studies Conference. Atlanta, GA.

 

2015

Grundmann, R. (2015, March). Harun Farocki’s unfinished business: From workers’ films to the global video workshop. Presented at the Society for Cinema and Media Studies conference in Montreal, Canada.

Jaramillo, D. L. (2015). Astrological TV: The creation and destruction of a genre. Communication, Culture, and Critique, 8(2), 309-326. (link)

Jaramillo, D. L. (2015). Keep Big Government out of your television set: The rhetoric of self-regulation before the television code. In V. Mayer, M. Banks, and B. Conor (Eds.), Production Studies, The Sequel!: Cultural Studies of Media Industries, Vol. 2. New York: Routledge. (link)

Jaramillo, D. L. (2015, November). Housewives don’t show their bosoms: Pre-code television viewers and the quest for government censorship. Presented at Film and History Conference. Madison, WI.

Jaramillo, D. L. (2015, June). The television code: Sacrificing art for commerce in early television. Presented at World History Association Conference. Savannah, GA.

Jaramillo, D. (2015, May). Researching the media industries: Problems and pathways to access and information. Presented at the International Communication Association in San Juan, Puerto Rico.

Jaramillo, D. L. (2015, March). Making the past portable. Presented at the Society for Cinema and Media Studies conference in Montreal, Canada.

Oppliger, P. A., & Davis, A. (2015). Portrayals of bullying: A content analysis of picture books for preschoolers. Early Childhood Education Journal, 44(5), 515-526. (link)

Oppliger, P., & Davis, A. (2015, April.) How to read a bully: A content analysis of bullying in children’s picture books. Presented at the Popular Culture Association Conference in New Orleans, LA.

Vigil, T. R. (2015). Conquering constraints and expanding ethos: FDR’s 1932 Commonwealth Club Address.  Studies in Media and Communication, 3(1), 62-72. (link)

Vigil, T. R. (2015). Conventional and unconventional rhetorical strategies: Michelle Obama’s 2008 and 2012 Democratic National Convention Addresses. In E. Natalle & J. Simon (Eds.), Michelle Obama: First Lady, American Rhetor. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books. (link)

 

2014

Guo, L., & Harlow, S. (2014). User-generated racism: An analysis of stereotypes of African Americans, Latinos and Asians in YouTube videos. Howard Journal of Communication, 25, 281-302. (link)

Jaramillo, D. L. (2014, March.) The rise and fall of the television broadcasters’ association. Presented at the Society for Cinema and Media Studies conference in Seattle, WA.

Oppliger, P. & Summers, C. (2014, August). Who’s the bully?: Teaching about bullies in situation comedies. Presented at the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication in Montreal, Canada.

Oppliger, P. (2014, August). He said, she laughed: Sex differences in joke telling and humor appreciation. Presented at the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication in Montreal, Canada.

Oppliger, P. & Shouse, E. (2014, June.) Disposition theory and humor ratings of insensitive jokes. Presented at the International Society of Humor Studies Conference in Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Oppliger, P. & Shouse, E. (2014, March.) Disposition theory and humor ratings of insensitive jokes. Presented at the International Society of Humor Studies Conference in Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Vigil, T. R. (2014). Feminine views in the feminine style: Convention speeches by presidential nominees’ spouses. Southern Communication Journal, 79(4), 327-346. (link)

Vigil, T. (2014, November). Telling personal tales: The use of narratives in convention speeches by nominees’ wives. Presented at the annual convention of the National Communication Association in Chicago, IL.

 

2013

Grundmann, R. (2013, March.) Adorno, Ranciere, and cinematic spectatorship: Is spectatorial emancipation a relevant concept?. Presented at the Society for Cinema and Media Studies conference in Chicago, IL.

Grundmann, R. (2013, February). The films of Michael Haneke. Keynote speaker at the Istanbul Modern’s “All About Haneke” Retrospective in Istanbul, Turkey.

Jaramillo, D. L. (2013). Rescuing television from ‘The Cinematic’: The perils of dismissing television style. In J. Jacobs & S. Peacock (Eds.), Television Aesthetics and Style (pp. 67-75). London: Bloomsbury. (link)

Jaramillo, D. L. (2013). Narcocorridos and Newbie Drug Dealers: The changing image of the Mexican Narco on US television. Ethnic and Racial Studies, 37(9), 1587-1604. (link)

Jaramillo, D. L. (2013). AMC: Stumbling toward a new television canon. Television and New Media, 14(2), 167-183. (link)

Jaramillo, D. L. (2013, March). Public vs. private: The fight to control early television content. Presented at the Society for Cinema and Media Studies conference in Chicago, IL.

Oppliger, P., Tamse, M., & Simon-Roberts, S. (2013, July.) White saviors: Joking about interracial adoptions and foster care in American situation comedies. Presented at the International Society of Humor Studies Conference, Williamsburg, VA.

Shouse, E., & Oppliger, P. A. (2013). Sarah is Magic: The (post-gendered?) comedy of Sarah Silverman. Comedy Studies, 3(2), 201-216. (link)

Vigil, T. R. (2013). George W. Bush’s first three inaugural addresses: Testing the utility of the inaugural genre. Southern Communication Journal, 78(5), 427-446. (link)

Vigil, T. (2013, November.) Rhetorically constructing connections: Strategies for enhancing identifications in the 2008 and 2012 nomination acceptance addresses. Presented at the National Communication Association conference in Washington, D.C.

Vigil, T. (2013, April). Rhetorically constructed consubstantiality: The importance of candidate identification building strategies in contemporary nomination acceptance addresses. Presented at the annual Midwest Political Science Association national conference in Chicago.

 

2012

Jaramillo, D. L. (2012). 9/11 as Real Estate Tragedy: Selling New York and the future of the Financial District. Critical Studies in Television: An International Journal of Television Studies, 7(1), 79-98. (link)

Lambert, C. A. & White, C. (2012). Feminization of the film? Occupational roles of public relations characters in movies. PR Journal, 6(4), 1-24. (link)

 

2011

Lambert, C. A. (2011). Cinema spin: Exploring film depictions of public relations practitioners. Communication Teacher, 25(4), 205-211. (link)

 

2010

Dudo, A., Brossard, D., Shanahan, J., Scheufele, D. A., Morgan, M., & Signorielli, N. (2010). Science on television in the 21st century: Recent trends in portrayals and their contributions to public attitudes toward science. Communication Research, 38(6), 754-777. (link)

Jaramillo, D. (2010). It’s not all talk: Editing and storytelling in As The World Turns. In S. Ford, A. de Kosnik, & C. L. Harrington (Eds.), The Survival of Soap Opera: Strategies for a New Media Era. Jackson, MS: The University Press of Mississippi. (link)

Morgan, M., & Shanahan, J. (2010). The state of cultivation. Journal of Broadcasting and Electronic Media, 54(2), 337-355. (link)

 

2008

Wu, H. D., & Izard, R. (2008). Representing the total community: Relationships between Asian American staff and Asian American coverage in nine U.S. newspapers. Journalism and Mass Communication Quarterly, 85(1), 99-112. (link)